United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) — Boko Haram Attacks — PLANET EARTH REFLECTIONS group

PLANET EARTH REFLECTIONS has over 2,400 members and over 51,000 photos. 

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

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Nigerian refugees struggle in aftermath of Boko Haram attacks:

UNHCR calls for urgent support for more than 35,000 people who fled a surge in militant attacks, and now face acute needs in Cameroon’s remote desert north.

Violence has been ongoing in northeast Nigeria since the Boko Haram insurgency erupted in 2009, forcing more than 2.5 million people from their homes within the Lake Chad Basin in a desperate search for safety.

Cameroon. Violence in Nigeria drives thousands across border

As the insurgency grinds on, thousands have been displaced several times within Nigeria itself, while thousands of others like Blama Tchama, have sought safety over the border on numerous occasions.

The MNJTF, which includes forces from Cameroon, Chad, Nigeria, Niger and Benin, aims at countering Boko Haram and preventing other insurgent groups from gaining ground across the Lake Chad region.

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Stanley Zimny (Thank You for 37 Million views)DefabledRafael Gomez – http://micamara.estango-roba66
Upside down Barossa Reservoir Reflections, South Australia

Wood Ducks and Water, Summer in South Australia

Mezza luna nell'ora blu

The Rock with Fall Reflections

Red Bush Reflection

UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR REFUGEES (UNHCR) — THE DREAM DIARIES — PLANET EARTH IN SILHOUETTES group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH IN SILHOUETTES has over 1,500 members and over 24,000 photos.

A new UNHCR project, The Dream Diaries, visualizes the dreams of children who have fled their homes and found a better life in Europe.

Four young ‘online creators’ have traveled over 7,000 kilometers across Europe to meet a dozen refugee and asylum-seeking children as part of a new project, in association with UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, that lets the youngsters’ imagination run free.

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orb1806BLANCA GOMEZalexinatempaJim MullhauptChrisGoldNY
Lone buzzard

Le pont qui s'effondre

Am Seeufer

Canada Geese

journey by boat

SIERRA CLUB — PROTECTING FLORIDA’S RIVER OF GRASS — PLANET EARTH IN SEPIA group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH IN SEPIA has over 400 members and over 5,000 photos. 

South Florida’s Biscayne aquifer is the primary source of drinking water for more than six million Sunshine State residents. Due to its surface proximity, the aquifer interacts with rainwater and other bodies of water, making it vulnerable to surface contaminants. So it would be really sensible to drill for oil in the Everglades, a recharge zone for the aquifer, right? Wrong!!

That’s the argument that local activists and elected officials have been making since July 2015, when Kanter Real Estate LLC applied for a permit for exploratory drilling on some of the 20,000 acres it owns in the Everglades. It’s located in a Water Conservation Area being restored under the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, passed by the US Congress in 2000 and still in effect.

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John KocijanskiWITHIN the FRAME Photography(5 Million views thathe Gallopping Geezer ‘5.0’ million + views….Hugh Spicer / UIsdean SpicerMcQuaide Photography
Manarola

Pulsatilla

Sepia Singel

Buried Fence Lines

Sepia Trees

HAWAII IS THE BIRD EXTINCTION CAPITAL OF THE WORLD — PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES has over 7,000 members and over 298,000 photos and videos. 

Since humans arrived, 95 of 142 bird species found nowhere else have become extinct on Hawaii. Thirty-three of Hawaii’s remaining 44 endemic birds are listed under the Endangered Species Act; ten of those have not been seen for decades and are likely extinct.

AKIKIKI A BIRD IN NEED

 ABC’s Hawaii Program has made the conservation of the ‘Akikiki and other forest birds one of its top priorities.

Troubled Times on the Hawaiian Islands:

Mosquito-borne diseases such as avian malaria and avian pox have decimated ‘Akikiki populations. The problem may worsen, as climate change could continue to raise the elevation where mosquitoes can live, further shrinking this bird’s habitat.

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tango-stumbleonl4tsRNRobertMicheline Canal
Windy summer sky

DSCF0795.jpg

Foreshortening of Bergamo Alta

Reflejo del Otoño

Sunset in Buarcos beach. Cabo Mondego, Figueira da Foz

BIRD OF THE WEEK — SHORT-EARED OWL — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 111,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

SHORT-EARED OWL

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Asio flammeus
POPULATION: 600,000 (North America); 3 million (worldwide).
TREND: Difficult to assess; locally common in some areas, endangered in others.
HABITAT: Open spaces: grasslands, agricultural fields, marshes, tundra.

The Short-eared Owl’s Latin name, flammeus, means “fiery” and refers to its boldly streaked plumage, which provides excellent camouflage in the open grasslands this bird favors. It is widely distributed around the world, with ten recognized subspecies. One of these, the Pueo, is Hawai’i’s only native owl.

Flying over open terrain and often active during the early morning and evening, the Short-eared Owl can take on a markedly ghost-like appearance. Usually silent, the bird flies close to the ground with deep, slow wing beats that give it a buoyant quality.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Gisela_Nagel-Fl-1619-Karmingimpel

Fulvous Whistling Ducks (Dendrocygna bicolor)

Kestrel incoming

Eastern Bluebird and young

Painted Bunting