UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR REFUGEES (UNHCR) — SYRIA — PLANET EARTH WILDLIFE AND NATURE group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH WILDLIFE AND NATURE has over 2,000 members and over 97,000 photos and videos. 

UNHCR logo

UNHCR increases aid in north-east Syria:

Displaced Syrians, who fled their homes in the border town of Ras al-Ain, receive humanitarian aid on October 12, 2019, in the town of Tal Tamr in the countryside of Syria’s northeastern Hasakeh province.

Syria. Young girl displaced by recent violence carries relief supplies

Among the immediate protection needs which have been identified are the lack of civil documentation, as people left their homes without papers and other belongings. Families have also been separated.

Some people are in need of psychological first aid and psychosocial support. UNHCR mobilized protection teams to identify critical protection needs of the most vulnerable, including people with specific needs, elderly people and those with disabilities and serious medical conditions.

All PLANET EARTH groups Contests

PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE is a must see group ck. it out. 

The autumn evening

dramatic sunset

Green shield bug / groene schildwants

Frucht einer Samtpappel

Marbled White Butterfly, Penang

 

SIERRA CLUB — TREE FRACKING — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME is our flagship group has over 12,000 members and over 821,000 photos and videos.

Contest #1 — Waterfalls

Contest #2 — Your Favorite Sunrise/Sunsets

Contest #3 — B/W Photography (Sepia is Welcome)

The drought that punished California from 2010 to 2015 killed more than 100 million trees, but some in Northern California’s Mendocino County survived just fine. How did they do it? Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin and the University of California, Berkeley, have found that—just like humans fracking oil and gas deposits in shale—tree roots are able to access substantial quantities of water stored in weathered bedrock. 

However it’s held, the amount of water is significant—4 to 21 inches of rock moisture was found in the test wells. Importantly, the amount of moisture held by the rock remains stable year over year, topping up whether winter rains are plentiful or scanty, with the remainder draining off into the groundwater table.

Top Contributors

John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)alpenglowtravelersDiegojack–MARCO POLO–tucker.tterence
Despite everything, a light

Travertine Terrace at Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park.

Gold

un lever de soleil scintillant...

Bryce Canyon : Hoodoos and pine trees . . .

SIERRA CLUB — 3 BILLION BIRDS ACROSS MANY SPECIES HAVE DISAPPEARED IN NORTH AMERICAN — PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE has over 3,700 members and over 162,000 photos.

Contest — Your Favorite Photography

Over the past 50 years, the conservation movement in North America has famously helped protect some of the most iconic birds from extinction, including bald eagles, wild turkeys, white pelicans, peregrine falcons, Kirtland’s warblers, and California condors. But a new study in the journal Science shows that while those rare birds were recovering, total bird numbers were plummeting, even among some of the most common backyard species.

The researchers found broad population decreases, not just with rare or threatened birds. “We saw that these losses occurred in the common species and across every habitat,” Rosenberg says. “Even birds we were calling generalists that should be well-adapted to human environments were in decline. Starlings and house sparrows, these invasive species that we thought may be taking over, were showing the same declines.

Top Contributors

alexinatempaJohn KocijanskiSARK S-Wl4tsValt3r Rav3ra – DEVOted!
A watch of a blow through. (FUJIFILM GFX50R shot)

no.1037

Cell Generation

no.907

Giraffes on holiday spend the day exploring Manhattan

Hundreds of bird species are on a track toward extinction. If these species blink out, we’ll have just one species to blame: ours — Marvelous Spatuletail — PLANET EARTH FLOWERS group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH FLOWERS has over 2,000 members and over 87,000 photos and videos.

The male Marvelous Spatuletail is a striking, high-energy spectacle, brandishing the purplish-blue spatules on its tail like a pair of castanets.

The birds wave these spatules around during communal courtship displays, which draw visiting females to observe and select a mate.

Top Contributors

3Point141Rafael Gomez – http://micamara.esAndreas PierTHE Holy Hand Grenade!minus1349
Sakura

1443

Krokusse 2009

1805

popy en hiver

SIERRA CLUB — FLOWERS — CLIMATE CHANGE THREATENS TWO-THIRDS OF NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME is our flagship group with over 12,000 members and over 818,000 photos and videos.

Contest #1- Transportation — Time to Vote

Contest #2- Your Favorite Bird — Time to Vote

Contest #3 — Horses — Time to Vote

 

A new report from the National Audubon Society shows that two-thirds of North America’s birds face major challenges including extinction if global temperatures are allowed to increase 3 degrees Celsius by 2100. However, if temperature rise is limited to 1.5 degrees, the majority of those disruptions can be stopped. 

While many scientists believe that a 1.5 degrees C rise in temperatures above pre-industrial levels is already inevitable, and some claim that the 2-degree threshold has already been crossed, the Audubon report suggests that there’s still time to mitigate some of the damage to birds. Limiting temperature rise to just 1.5, the report says, would limit the extinction vulnerability of 70 percent of North American species at risk.

Top Contributors

John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)alpenglowtravelersDiegojack–MARCO POLO–tucker.tterence
Bouquet Vanille Pathé <<Fluor F>> 115mm

Pink Rose

Macro

PB193403 -2J9EX10

PB103254 -1