BIRD OF THE WEEK — COMMON LOON — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 115,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

COMMON LOON

The Common Loon is the largest and most widespread of the five loon species found in North America. A formidable swimmer and diver like the King Penguin or Red-breasted Merganser, this handsome waterbird is a veritable avian submarine, beautifully adapted to a life in and on the water.

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Gavia immer
POPULATION: 500,000-700,000
TREND: Stable
HABITAT: Nests on lakes and ponds in northern forests; winters on marine bays and coasts, and lakes.

Common Loons have a number of distinctive calls. One of the best-known is a fluttering tremolo call, which some say sounds like crazed laughter, and may have given the bird its common North American name. Common Loons give this call when they feel threatened, particularly in the vicinity of their nests. 

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UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR REFUGEES — (UNHCR) — PLANET EARTH REFLECTIONS group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH REFLECTIONS has over 2,000 members and over 52,000 photos and videos.

UNHCR logo

Almost 8,000 Cameroonian refugees have fled to Nigeria’s eastern and southern states of Taraba and Cross Rivers over the past fortnight, bringing the total Cameroonian refugee population in the country to nearly 60,000 people.

UNHCR, the UN refugee Agency, expects further arrivals as refugees inform that more people are still in remote border areas and could be on their way trying to reach Nigeria.

Nigeria. UNHCR launches appeal for Cameroonian Anglophone refugees

This latest influx took place just before Cameroon’s general elections last weekend as people fled ongoing violence between security forces and armed groups. The exodus comes on top of increased internal displacement witnessed in Cameroon’s Northwest and Southwest regions in the last quarter of 2019.

Refugees reported fleeing violence and some even arrived across the border with gunshot wounds. According to new arrivals, most come from areas near the border and have trekked across savannah and forests to reach Nigeria.

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GREENPEACE — SCIENTISTS SOUND ALARM ABOUT “DESTRUCTIVE” DEEP SEA MINING — PLANET EARTH UNDERWATER group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH UNDERWATER has over 1,000 members and over 40,000 photos and videos.

GREENPEACE

Kingston, Jamaica – Marine scientists from around the world have issued a stark warning about the emerging industry of deep sea mining, stating that its development “puts the overall health of ocean ecosystems under threat” and could contribute to climate breakdown. [1] Greenpeace activists went to the International Seabed Authority (ISA) annual meeting in Kingston, joined by the members of Jamaica Environment Trust and representatives of several other Jamaican civil society organizations, to deliver a  letter of concern by 28 scientists from eight countries to the participants of the meeting. A banner was unfurled at the event which said “No deep sea mining” as Greenpeace demands protection of the sea bed and global oceans.

Esperanza in Jamaica with Banner © Bárbara Sánchez Palomero / Greenpeace

Activists from around the world have sailed on board the Greenpeace ship Esperanza, to join in a peaceful assembly in front of one of the battlegrounds for protecting the deep oceans from monster mining machines: the International Seabed Authority (ISA), which is hosting its 25th Assembly in Kingston, Jamaica.

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BIRD OF THE WEEK — PERUVIAN DIVING-PETREL — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 115,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

PERUVIAN DIVING-PETREL

At first glance, the Peruvian Diving-petrel is small — only about the length of an American Robin — and has a dark-and-light color pattern common to many other seabirds such as the Hawaiian Petrel and Townsend’s Shearwater. Unlike petrels and shearwaters, though, diving-petrels are more aquatic than aerial, spending most of their time swimming.

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Pelecanoides garnotii
POPULATION: At least 75,000
IUCN STATUS: Endangered
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Near-shore ocean waters; nests on small offshore islands

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NEW ZEALAND — TASMAN SEA –ANDREAS KAY PHOTOGRAPHY — PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD has over 1,600 members and over 92,000 photos and videos.

Right now, the New Zealand bottom trawling fleet is setting out for yet another season of destruction. Each year, out of sight, the NZ fishing fleet go on the hunt for orange roughy using one of the most destructive forms of fishing ever devised. They have to be stopped, and one of the first things we need to do is make people aware of what’s really going on out there.

New Zealand trawl fleet to continue destruction of deep-sea ecosystems 
in South Pacific on the high seas.

New Zealand and Australia to adopt a deeply flawed regulation that will allow continued degradation and destruction of biologically rich and diverse ecosystems in the deep-sea from the Louisville Ridge in the western central South Pacific all the way across to the Tasman Sea.

We’ve stopped environmental crimes in the past and held companies to account. Together in our thousands, we’re forcing change and seeing results.

More and more people are saying ‘no’ to trashing the oceans, forests and climate – and standing up to protect our air, land and water from pollution.

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