BIRD OF THE WEEK — RED WINGED BLACKBIRD — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group has over 1,500 members and over 101,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Agelaius phoeniceus 
POPULATION: 150 million
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Breeds and winters in fresh and saltwater marshes; also meadows, prairies, and fields, especially near ditches or ponds.

The liquid, burbling “conk-a-ree!” of a male Red-winged Blackbird on territory is a sure sign of spring, or at least its pending arrival. This bird’s common name derives from the sleek black males’ distinctive shoulder patches, or epaulets, which flash red in flight and while the bird is singing on territory.

The Red-winged Blackbird belongs to the family Icteridae, which includes the Eastern MeadowlarkTricolored BlackbirdRusty Blackbird, and Baltimore Oriole.

Top Contributors

DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
PAINTED BUNTING munching on Biden Alba at Circle B Bar Reserve, Lakeland, Florida

Vermillion

RGP_8249-4

Cape Robin Chat

INCA JAY BIRD 20181017_2018 BRONX ZOO_D85_7069

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BIRD OF THE WEEK — OILBIRD — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,400 members and over 93,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

ABC

OILBIRD

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Steatornis caripensis 
POPULATION: >10,000
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Breeds and roosts in caves sometimes roosts in trees.

The Oilbird is an oddity. It’s a nocturnal, fruit-eating bird that uses echolocation, much like a bat, to navigate. It nests inside caves in noisy colonies, where its raspy wails give it the Spanish nickname guácharo, “one who whines or laments.” Oilbirds are in their own family but are part of a larger group of night birds including Eastern Whip-poor-will, Chuck-will’s-widow, and Common Potoo.

Oilbird, Greg Homel, Natural Elements Productions

Oilbirds spend their days in darkness, resting deep inside caves and sometimes within thick tree canopies. They awake just before dusk and leave their roosts to feed, using keen nocturnal vision and sense of smell to locate fruit, which they pluck from trees while hovering.

Top Contributors

DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
purple Honeycreeper Cyanerpus Caeruleus//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

White-headed Wren (Anchicayá - Colombia)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Pheucticus melanocephalus ♂ (Black-headed Grosbeak) - WA, USA//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

IMG_0277//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Black-chinned hummingbird (Archilochus alexandri) enjoying the flowers at the Desert Botanical Garden, Phoenix, Arizona//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

BOKEH — PLANET EARTH FLOWERS group

 

PLANET EARTH FLOWERS has over 2,000 members and over 76,000 photos and videos.

Contest — Purple or Blue Flowers

Top Contributors

3Point141Rafael Gomez – http://micamara.esred-sequoiaTHE Holy Hand Grenade!minus1349
Lonesome and blue//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

In the Middle//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Balanced on Purple//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Lily//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Standing Tall//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

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BIRD OF THE WEEK — RED-FACED WARBLER — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,100 members and over 55,000 photos and videos. 

Top Contributors

DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos

ABC

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Cardellina rubrifrons
POPULATION: 700,000
TREND: Declining
HABITAT: Breeds in high mountain forests, winters in cloud forests

The Red-faced Warbler is one of only two North American warblers with red plumage; the other is the Painted Redstart, another species of the Mexican border.

This flashy warbler shares high-altitude forest habitats (sometimes called “sky islands” because they are isolated mountaintops surrounded by much drier habitat) with other neotropical migrants such as Olive-sided Flycatcher and Thick-billed Parrot. Red-faced Warblers are sensitive to habitat loss on both breeding and wintering grounds.
Sanhaçu de encontro azul//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Rainbow Lorikeets & Bottlebrush in springtime//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

winter blues//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Saí verde macho//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

MASKED FLOWERPIERCER Diglossa cyanea Taking Flight at the Yanacocha Reserve in ECUADOR. Photo by Peter Wendelken.//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Siberian Rubythroat (Calliope calliope) 红喉歌鸲 hóng hóu gē qú//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Parrot//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Espécie: CATIRUMBAVA//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Wood Stork HDR 04-20160405//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Golden Hour//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Indian Bush Lark (Mirafra erythroptera)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Plain prinia..//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js