PLANET EARTH IN BOKEH AND DOF group

PLANET EARTH IN BOKEH AND DOF group has over 750 members and over 21,000 photos.

Greenpeace

The Environmentalist
(037) - " My heart, I do not know why be happy when it sees you! "//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

esplosione//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

P7180038.sm//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

P7060029.sm//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Vine leaves on Manor's wooden fence//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

All PLANET EARTH groups supports  United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)

BIRD OF THE WEEK — GREAT FRIGATEBIRD — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD  has over 1,300 members and over 70,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

Great Frigatebird

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Fregata minor
POPULATION: About 10,000 in Hawai’i; global population unknown
TREND: Unknown
HABITAT: Breeds on small, remote tropical islands

The Great Frigatebird has a distinctive flight silhouette, with long, pointed wings and a deeply forked tail. Like the Swallow-tailed Kite, its wings allow for graceful aerial acrobatics and effortless soaring. Frigatebirds often use their aerial agility to harass other birds into dropping their prey, earning this pirate of tropical skies the nickname of “Man-o’-War Bird.”

Like California Condor and other raptors, Great Frigatebirds use thermals to soar and glide for hours. Frigatebirds may even sleep on the wing!

Top Contributors

DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos

Juvenile coppersmith barbet//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Athene cunicularia| Burrowing Owl//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

American Pipit//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Green-headed Tanager//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Surprise in the Backyard//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

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BIRD OF THE WEEK — GRASSHOPPER SPARROW — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,000 members and over 67,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

GRASSHOPPER SPARROW

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Ammodramus savannarum
POPULATION: 31 million
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Breeds and winters in grasslands, including prairies, pastures, meadows, and old fields.

More often heard than seen, the secretive Grasshopper Sparrow gets its name for the buzzing, insect-like quality of its songs. When seen among the dense grasses where it breeds, this small, short-tailed bird appears big-headed and large-billed compared to other sparrows.

Habitat loss and degradation remain the greatest threats to Grasshopper Sparrow and other grassland-dependent species such as Baird’s Sparrow, Long-billed Curlew, and Bobolink. Increased use of pesticides, brood parasitism by Brown-headed Cowbirds, and loss of wintering habitat have also contributed to population declines.

Top Contributors

Josef Lex (El buen soldado Švejk)Michael Lockeroba66Ximo MichavilaRafael Gomez – http://micamara.es
Abellerol lluint els colors//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Avocet - Close fly-by//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

House Wren//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Zoo Puerto Iguasu//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Acorn Woodpecker//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Just Married ..//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

turkey buzzard//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Canada Warbler//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Lunchtime!//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

The least little thing//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

haos//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Garrulus glandarius//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Mynas on a field//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

BIRD OF THE WEEK — DICKCISSEL — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

BIRD OF THE WEEK

DICKCISSEL

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Spiza americana
POPULATION: 27 million
TREND: Stable
HABITAT: Open grasslands, including prairies or pastures, and overgrown weedy fields. Uses wetlands and marshes during migration

The male Dickcissel resembles a big sparrow or miniature meadowlark, with a black, V-shaped throat patch contrasting with its bright yellow breast. This bird is named for its loud, persistent song: “dick-dick-ciss-ciss-ciss.” Dickcissels are long-distance Neotropical migrants, spending their winters in the llanos (central plains) of Venezuela.

Like other grassland species, including Northern Bobwhite and Loggerhead Shrike, the Dickcissel has been impacted by habitat loss and pesticide use. Dickcissels also risk colliding with towers, turbines, and glass during their nocturnal migrations.

Sanhaçu de encontro azul adulto//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Felosa-poliglota, Melodious warbler (Hippolais polyglotta)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Purple honeycreeper Tanagra medsiurbė purpurinė//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

mamBo//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Today's Sunset//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus) Stjärtmes//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Red throated Ant-Tanager. Habia fuscicuada//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Amazilia tzacatl//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Pheucticus melanocephalus ♂ (Black-headed Grosbeak)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Etourneau sansonnet//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Top Contributors

DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos

BIRD OF THE WEEK — GRASS GREEN TANAGER — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

Please ck. out bottom of page (last photo) for the Flower of the Year for 2016. It’s a beauty. 

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,300 members and over 69,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

GRASS-GREEN TANAGER

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Chlorornis riefferii
POPULATION: Unknown, but considered fairly common
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Humid mountain forests and edges, Colombia south to Bolivia

The aptly named Grass-green Tanager is the only member of its genus, Chloronis, a Greek word derived from khloros (green) and ornis (bird). In Spanish its common name is Tangara Lorito, “little parrot tanager.” Whatever the language, this bird of the Andes is an unmistakable sight: an intense green with chestnut mask and undertail accented by bright red legs, feet, and bill.

Although not endemic or endangered like the Cherry-throated Tanager, the Grass-green Tanager is still vulnerable to habitat loss caused by land clearing for farming, grazing, logging, and human settlement.

Black-throated Green Warbler III//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Entering//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Faucon crécerelle (Falco tinnunculus)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

48 Bluetit//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Agility//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Saíra-Sete-Cores//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Sandhill Crane Turning Eggs 16-0514-1255//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Hummer at Crocosmia//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus ♂ (Yellow-headed Blackbird)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Wood Stork HDR 04-20160405//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Please ck. out PLANET EARTH FLOWERS group. A must see group for flower lovers. 

Contest — Yellow Flowers
Miniature Violets//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Einen schönen Tag euch allen*** Have a nice day everyone//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Feelings//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Taratahi Sunrise.//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Heather Erica Cinerea 'Purple Beauty'//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js