Sunday Photo Magazine — 4/7/2019

PLASTIC FREE NEW ZEALAND

Let’s end plastic pollution in Aotearoa

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BACK IN THE DAY 5,631 members

Rabat

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME 12,510 members

Three-toed Woodpecker flaking bark from a branch

PLANET EARTH FLOWERS 2,026 members

Orchid Purple

PLANET EARTH BUTTERFLIES, BEES, BUGS, AND INSECTS 3,954 members

Confused Mosquito

PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES 7,176 members

VINEYARDS AND CASTLE

PLANET EARTH SUNRISE SUNSETS 5,149 members

March Sunset

PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE 3,725 members

Sorrindo

PLANET EARTH ANIMALS/BIRDS 4,479 members

A Roller leaving the nest

PLANET EARTH ARCHITECTURE 5,707 members

Strelka

PLANET EARTH WEATHER 893 members

Stormy Night

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD 1,450 members

Gisela_Nagel-Fl-1988-Baumpieper

PLANET EARTH IN BOKEH AND DOF 905 members

Beautiful spring

PLANET EARTH UNDERWATER 1,028 members

065_adj_DSC_7944

PLANET EARTH IN SEPIA 461 members

Desert Botanical Gardens IR #8 2018; Cacti

PLANET EARTH IN HDR 365 members

Supertree Grove, Singapore (3 of 1) (33 of 1)

PLANET EARTH REFLECTIONS 2,502 members

REFLEJOS

PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD 1,432 members

RED

PLANET EARTH 100 YEAR CLUB 511 members

BEZIERS 1

PLANET EARTH NIGHT LIGHTS 1,020 members

night in Skaryszewski

PLANET EARTH VINTAGE ADVERTISING 876 members

1978 Ad, Roxanne Studios Photo Offers

PLANET EARTH WILDLIFE AND NATURE 1,809 members

P2151047c-EditFAA

PLANET EARTH IN PANORAMA 1,872 members

Pausdam

PLANET EARTH MOUNTAINS 858 members

Kulusuk Greenland, August 1982

PLANET EARTH VINTAGE ARCHITECTURE 763 members

mantion of Georg de Lalande

PLANET EARTH URBAN LANDSCAPES 1,043 members

Florentine Bridges

PLANET EARTH FIELD GUIDE TO AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE 335 members

Asheville 18

PLANET EARTH IN SILHOUETTES 1,491 members

Last Sunset of the Year! (Thorn over sun)

PLANET EARTH AGRICULTURE 702 members

Bardenas Reales Navarra 16

PLANET EARTH HORSES 972 members
Ample Horse Power!//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

PLANET EARTH ON BLACK 427 members

Hornet - Vespa crabro (18)

PLANET EARTH TRANSPORTATION 1,882 members

9V-SPM | SIA | B744 | KLAX

PLANET EARTH TRAINS AND RAILROADS 873 members

GYSEV and EKOL

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RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD — SEPIA PHOTOGRAPHY — PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES has over 7,000 members and over 277,000 photos and videos. 

Contest — Black and photography (Sepia is Welcome)

RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD

Tiny yet ferocious, the Ruby-throat weighs less than a nickel and can fly nonstop across the Gulf of Mexico.

It’s easy to mistake a Ruby-throated Hummingbird for a bee at first glance. Their wings beat 60 to 80 times a second, and like the Mangrove Hummingbird and other hummingbird species, become a blur of motion.

Top Contributors

tango-stumbleonl4tsRNRobertMicheline Canal
sunrise_0129

Backlit landscape in sepia!

135/365

Untitled

Texas Landscape in Winter

BIRD OF THE WEEK — COMMON GRACKLE — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 102,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

COMMON GRACKLE

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Quiscalus quiscula 
POPULATION: 69 million
TREND: Decreasing 
HABITAT: Breeds in open and semi-open areas. Winters in a variety of open habitats throughout the southeastern United States.

Common Grackles are recognized by their long, keel-shaped tails, fairly heavy and sharp bills, yellow eyes, and (in males) glossy black plumage with an iridescent sheen. The word “grackle” derives from the Latin for Europe’s jackdaw or another crow, somewhat similar-looking but unrelated birds.

The Common Grackle belongs to the Icteridae family, so is related to the Rusty BlackbirdTricolored Blackbird, and Baltimore Oriole. These birds have an interesting trait that helps them use the earth’s geomagnetic fields to navigate.

Top Contributors

DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Marsh Wren 18-1111-8724

Golden-crowned Kinglet_4

Rolf_Nagel-Fl-6806-Carpodacus_erythrinus

Discussing travel plans

Red-breasted flycatcher (Ficedula parva).

HISPANIOLA’S HIDDEN TREASURE — BLACK-CAPPED PETREL — PLANET EARTH ARCHITECTURE group

PLANET EARTH ARCHITECTURE has over 6,000 members and over 254,000 photos and videos. 

Contest — Floors

BLACK-CAPPED PETREL

The “little devil,” or Black-capped Petrel, is among the rarest and most secretive seabirds in the Western Hemisphere. Extreme habitat loss on their breeding grounds was thought to have driven the bird extinct until its rediscovery in 1963. This species remains in danger of extinction, with fewer than 2,000 pairs in existence.

These seabirds spend most of their lives in flight over open water, returning to land only to breed. One reason Black-capped Petrels remain little known is that their breeding sites are hidden in the rugged mountains of Hispaniola, the Caribbean island shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

Sign up for ABC’s eNews to learn how you can help protect birds

Top Contributors

Josef Lex (El buen soldado Švejk)Michael Lockeroba66Ximo MichavilaRafael Gomez – http://micamara.es
St. Nicholas Cathedral in Nicholas Convent (Pereslavl-Zalessky, Russia)

Burano

Asilah - Morocco

tableau de façade

The Bridge at Konitsa

BIRD OF THE WEEK — SPOTTED TOWHEE — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 99,000 photos and videos.

 

BIRD OF THE WEEK 

SPOTTED TOWHEE

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Pipilo maculatus 
POPULATION: 30 million
TREND: Stable
HABITAT: Forest edges, shrubs, thickets, brushy backyards, and parks.

The Spotted Towhee and its close relative, the Eastern Towhee, were once considered one species — the Rufous-sided Towhee — but were recognized as distinct species in 1995. One of the distinguishing features of the Spotted Towhee is the white spotting splashed over its wings and back. (The Eastern Towhee is dark-backed.)

The word “towhee” mimics the loud whistle of the Eastern Towhee. Although the Spotted Towhee retained this name after the species split, its call is actually more of a cat-like mew, reminiscent of a Gray Catbird.

Top Contributors

DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Cape Sugarbird

Australian Ringneck Parrot eating flowers on Coral Tree

Japanese green pheasant

57 Bluetit

27 Goldfinch