BIRD OF THE WEEK — OILBIRD — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,400 members and over 93,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

ABC

OILBIRD

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Steatornis caripensis 
POPULATION: >10,000
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Breeds and roosts in caves sometimes roosts in trees.

The Oilbird is an oddity. It’s a nocturnal, fruit-eating bird that uses echolocation, much like a bat, to navigate. It nests inside caves in noisy colonies, where its raspy wails give it the Spanish nickname guácharo, “one who whines or laments.” Oilbirds are in their own family but are part of a larger group of night birds including Eastern Whip-poor-will, Chuck-will’s-widow, and Common Potoo.

Oilbird, Greg Homel, Natural Elements Productions

Oilbirds spend their days in darkness, resting deep inside caves and sometimes within thick tree canopies. They awake just before dusk and leave their roosts to feed, using keen nocturnal vision and sense of smell to locate fruit, which they pluck from trees while hovering.

Top Contributors

DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
purple Honeycreeper Cyanerpus Caeruleus//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

White-headed Wren (Anchicayá - Colombia)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Pheucticus melanocephalus ♂ (Black-headed Grosbeak) - WA, USA//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

IMG_0277//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Black-chinned hummingbird (Archilochus alexandri) enjoying the flowers at the Desert Botanical Garden, Phoenix, Arizona//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

BIRDS — CARDINALS — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME our home is our flagship group with over 12,000 members and over 772,000 photos and videos.

Contest — Waterfalls

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John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)alpenglowtravelersDiegojack–MARCO POLO–tucker.tterence
When a Cardinal appears in your yard, it's a visitor from heaven.//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Male Cardinal_78aa//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Snow Storm Coming, Better Stock up//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Northern cardinal - female//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Female Cardinal//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

BIRD OF THE WEEK — GRAY CATBIRD — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,400 members and over 93,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

GRAY CATBIRD

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Dumetella carolinensis 
POPULATION: 29 million
TREND: Slight increase
HABITAT: Dense thickets, brushy suburban areas, and gardens.

The Gray Catbird is a familiar member of the Mimidae (mimic) family, a group of birds that includes noted songsters such as Northern Mockingbird and Sage Thrasher. Like its relatives, the Gray Catbird mimics a variety of sounds, but this bird is best known for the cat-like mewing calls that give the species its common name.

Gray Catbirds often sing from a high perch while displaying; this behavior gave rise to an idiom heard in the southern United States, “sitting in the catbird seat,” which refers to someone in an advantageous position.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
072718146627asmweb//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Yellow Warbler//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Surucuá-de-barriga-vermelha (Trogon curucui).//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Great Tit//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Red-winged Blackbird//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

BIRD OF THE WEEK — GALÁPAGOS PETREL — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,400 members and over 92,000 photos and videos.

ABC

BIRD OF THE WEEK

GALÁPAGOS PETREL

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Pterodroma phaeopygia 
POPULATION: 6,000-15,000
IUCN STATUS: Critically Endangered
TREND: Declining
HABITAT: Breeds on the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador; otherwise at sea.

The swift-flying Galápagos Petrel is known by locals as patapegada, or “web-footed one.” Once lumped with Hawaiian Petrel as a species known as the Dark-Rumped Petrel, this seabird was split into a unique species in 2002 by the American Ornithologist’s Union on the basis of genetic and morphologic distinctions.

With long wings and a unique flight pattern, this petrel is part of a larger group of seabirds known as “gadfly” petrels.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Bombycilla garrulus//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

721A0173//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER - The Blackburnian is also one of the very best of the warblers. At Fort DeSoto Park//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

ROSEATE SPOONBILL at Circle B Bar Reserve, Lakeland, Florida (EXPLORE)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Gisela_Nagel-Fl9315-Bartmeise//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

BIRD OF THE WEEK — CEDAR WAXWING — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,400 members and over 92,000 photos and videos. 

ABC

BIRD OF THE WEEK

CEDAR WAXWING

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Bombycilla cedrorum 
POPULATION: 57 million
TREND: Increasing
HABITAT: Open woodlands, farms, orchards, and suburban gardens, especially with fruiting trees and shrubs.

The Cedar Waxwing’s genus name, Bombycilla, means “silk-tail” and refers to its dapper-looking plumage. The species name, cedrorum, is Latin for “of the cedars” and reflects its fondness for the small cones of the eastern red cedar.

The “wax” tipping the Cedar Waxwing’s secondary wing feathers is actually an accumulation of the organic pigment astaxanthin, a carotenoid that gives red fruits their color. The tips increase in number and size with an individual’s age, and immature birds may show no red wingtips at all. Some scientists speculate that waxwings evolved these waxy tips to signal important information — such as age and social status — to other birds within the flock.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Crimson sunbird in water canna//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Great Blue Heron nest.//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Le moineau//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Yellow Wagtail in a tulip field//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Sedge Warbler//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js