HAWAII IS THE BIRD EXTINCTION CAPITAL OF THE WORLD — PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES has over 7,000 members and over 287,000 photos and videos. 

Contest — Open Spaces

Since humans arrived, 95 of 142 bird species found nowhere else have become extinct on Hawaii. Thirty-three of Hawaii’s remaining 44 endemic birds are listed under the Endangered Species Act; ten of those have not been seen for decades and are likely extinct.

AKIKIKI A BIRD IN NEED

 ABC’s Hawaii Program has made the conservation of the ‘Akikiki and other forest birds one of its top priorities.

Troubled Times on the Hawaiian Islands:

Mosquito-borne diseases such as avian malaria and avian pox have decimated ‘Akikiki populations. The problem may worsen, as climate change could continue to raise the elevation where mosquitoes can live, further shrinking this bird’s habitat.

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Windy summer sky

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Foreshortening of Bergamo Alta

Reflejo del Otoño

Sunset in Buarcos beach. Cabo Mondego, Figueira da Foz

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BIRD OF THE WEEK — GRAY-BREASTED MOUNTAIN-TOUCAN — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 103,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

GRAY-BREASTED MOUNTAIN-TOUCAN

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Andigena hypoglauca 
POPULATION: Unknown
IUCN STATUS: Near Threatened
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Cloud forest in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru.

The colorful Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan inhabits chilly, damp, mountainous terrain, unlike its larger lowland relatives the Channel-billed and Keel-billed Toucans. In fact, its genus name Andigena means “coming from the Andes Mountains” — a nod to this toucan’s sloping habitat.

The Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan can be differentiated from the three other mountain-toucan species by its red-, yellow-, and black-banded bill and, in one subspecies, its piercing yellow eyes.

SONY-ILCE-A9, Bluebird,05806, 1-1600, f-9, ISO 1600, 100-400@560mm

Bath time

Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus)

Red-cheeked Cordon-bleu

Peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus

Stresemann’s Bristlefront — Critically Endangered — PLANET EARTH FLOWERS group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH FLOWERS has over 1,500 members and over 106,000 photos.

Stresemann’s Bristlefront — Critically Endangered

Estimated population: One known individual

IUCN Status: Critically Endangered

Location: Bahia State, Brazil

Perhaps the world’s rarest bird, only one Stresemann’s Bristlefront is known to survive in the wild. Unfortunately, this bird is confined to one of the most fragmented and degraded – and vulnerable – forests in the Americas.

Stresemann's Bristlefront ranks among the rarest of birds. Photo by Ciro Albano

After a 50-year disappearance, Stresemann’s Bristlefront was rediscovered in 1995. In 2007, ABC supported the creation of the Songbird Forest Reserve to protect its remaining habitat. However, following a severe drought and a series of fires in 2016, the bird once again disappeared. Efforts to re-locate the bird proved successful when a single female bristlefront was found in December of 2018.

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White-throated Kingfishers: courtship dance

Long-tailed tit

superb fruit dove male

Fantail - Showing those beautiful tail feathers

Skulking Chinese hwamei

BIRD OF THE WEEK — IVORY-BILLED WOODPECKER — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 106,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

IVORY-BILLED WOODPECKER

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Campephilus principalis
POPULATION: Unknown
IUCN STATUS: Critically Endangered
TREND: Probably extinct
HABITAT: Hardwood swamps and pine forests.

The largest of its tribe in the United States, the impressive Ivory-billed Woodpecker was also called the “Lord God Bird,” after the typical reaction of people who saw it swoop into view. This charismatic species inhabited untouched bottomlands and swamps that once stretched across the southeastern United States.

The Ivory-billed Woodpecker was never a common bird, since it depended upon enormous, unbroken expanses of southern swamps providing the space and food it needed to thrive. Once its habitat began to disappear due to uncontrolled logging, the woodpecker became increasingly scarce. It was frequently shot by hunters and collectors, which likely contributed to its disappearance.

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Watch the Birdie

Great Blue Heron building the nest.

Cassin's Finch, female

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Greenpeace USA

ENDANGERED — MANGROVE HUMMINGBIRD — HDR — PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE has over 3,700 members and over 158,000 photos.

Contest Your Favorite Photo (Sepia Is Welcome)

MANGROVE HUMMINGBIRD

The species’ limited range and declining numbers have led the International Union for Conservation of Nature to classify the Mangrove Hummingbird as Endangered.

Birders and ecotourists can visit the Osa to see the Mangrove Hummingbird and other birds found nowhere else. Visit Conservation Birding to learn more.

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Under a cloudy sky

Herrgottswinkel in der Stube

Dandelion 2

Graphical Landscape

SHELL: MILWAUKEE PLANT