BIRD OF THE WEEK — BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 113,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Poecile atricapillus
POPULATION: 39 million
TREND: Stable
HABITAT: Forests, thickets, parks, backyards.

The feisty Black-capped Chickadee is the most common and widespread of the seven chickadee species found in North America. Named for its call and trademark black cap, this little bird is a common sight at backyard bird feeders

Each fall, Black-capped Chickadees gather and store large supplies of seeds in many different places – an adaptation that helps them to survive harsh winters. But how do they remember where they stash their supplies of seed?

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
At home in the cactus

Male Woodpecker

Agró blau al capvespre

Garrulus glandarius - Eurasian jay

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HISPANIOLA’S HIDDEN TREASURE — BLACK-CAPPED PETREL — PLANET EARTH ARCHITECTURE group

PLANET EARTH ARCHITECTURE has over 6,000 members and over 272,000 photos and videos. 

BLACK-CAPPED PETREL

The “little devil,” or Black-capped Petrel, is among the rarest and most secretive seabirds in the Western Hemisphere. Extreme habitat loss on their breeding grounds was thought to have driven the bird extinct until its rediscovery in 1963. This species remains in danger of extinction, with fewer than 2,000 pairs in existence.

These seabirds spend most of their lives in flight over open water, returning to land only to breed. One reason Black-capped Petrels remain little known is that their breeding sites are hidden in the rugged mountains of Hispaniola, the Caribbean island shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

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Josef Lex (El buen soldado Švejk)Michael Lockeroba66Ximo MichavilaRafael Gomez – http://micamara.es
St. Nicholas Cathedral in Nicholas Convent (Pereslavl-Zalessky, Russia)

Burano

Asilah - Morocco

tableau de façade

The Bridge at Konitsa

BIRD OF THE WEEK — RESPLENDENT QUETZAL — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 113,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

RESPLENDENT QUETZAL

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Pharomachrus mocinno
POPULATION: Approximately 50,000 individuals.
IUCN STATUS: Near Threatened
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Montane cloud forest.

The Resplendent Quetzal is an unforgettable sight, with shimmering plumage of metallic blues, greens, and reds. Males also have a crest of bristly golden-green feathers and during breeding season, grow elongated uppertail feathers that form a long, flowing train.

This spectacular species belongs to the trogon family, a group of colorful, fruit-eating birds found in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. Other family members include the Golden-headed Quetzal and Haiti’s national bird, the Hispaniolan Trogon.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos

Martin-pêcheur huppé

Chloris chloris - European greenfinch

Rufous Hummingbird

Burrowing Owl

Striated Thornbill

Green woodpecker

HAWAII IS THE BIRD EXTINCTION CAPITAL OF THE WORLD — PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES has over 7,000 members and over 303,000 photos and videos. 

Since humans arrived, 95 of 142 bird species found nowhere else have become extinct on Hawaii. Thirty-three of Hawaii’s remaining 44 endemic birds are listed under the Endangered Species Act; ten of those have not been seen for decades and are likely extinct.

AKIKIKI A BIRD IN NEED

 ABC’s Hawaii Program has made the conservation of the ‘Akikiki and other forest birds one of its top priorities.

Troubled Times on the Hawaiian Islands:

Mosquito-borne diseases such as avian malaria and avian pox have decimated ‘Akikiki populations. The problem may worsen, as climate change could continue to raise the elevation where mosquitoes can live, further shrinking this bird’s habitat.

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Windy summer sky

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Foreshortening of Bergamo Alta

Reflejo del Otoño

Sunset in Buarcos beach. Cabo Mondego, Figueira da Foz

BIRD OF THE WEEK — ANTIOQUIA BRUSHFINCH — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 112,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

ANTIOQUIA BRUSHFINCH

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Atlapetes blancae
POPULATION: 50-100 individuals
IUCN STATUS: Critically Endangered
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Native scrub and forest edge.

The Antioquia Brushfinch was first described in 2007, but only on the basis of three museum specimens. A live bird was not found in the field until 2018, when an unfamiliar brushfinch was spotted by a keen-eyed agronomist on his way to weekly mass on the outskirts of Medellín, Colombia.

This newly rediscovered relative of Ecuador’s Pale-headed Brushfinch joins the ranks of some of the rarest birds in the Western Hemisphere, including thBlue-eyed Ground-Dove, Bahama Nuthatch, and Stresemann’s Bristlefront.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
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Hummingbird and branch

Ground feeding song sparrow

Rufous hummingbird, perched

Tufted Titmouse