BIRD OF THE WEEK — GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 111,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Regulus satrapa
POPULATION: 130 million
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Breeds in boreal forest, winters in variety of forest habitats.

The tiny Golden-crowned Kinglet is one of the world’s smallest perching birds. At only five grams (about the weight of two pennies), it’s not much larger than a Ruby-throated Hummingbird. Its genus name, Regulus, means “little king,” and refers to the bright yellow and orange feathers that crown this bird’s black-and-white-striped head.

A Golden-crowned Kinglet needs to eat constantly to fuel a high body temperature and metabolic rate, both of which help combat the cold. If a kinglet goes without food for only a few hours during the day, it will starve and freeze to death.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos

Black redstart mother

Hooded Parrot (Female)

Great Rosefinch (Carpodacus rubicilla)

Robin Sunbathing

Pied flycatcher

BIRD OF THE WEEK — SHORT-EARED OWL — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 111,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

SHORT-EARED OWL

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Asio flammeus
POPULATION: 600,000 (North America); 3 million (worldwide).
TREND: Difficult to assess; locally common in some areas, endangered in others.
HABITAT: Open spaces: grasslands, agricultural fields, marshes, tundra.

The Short-eared Owl’s Latin name, flammeus, means “fiery” and refers to its boldly streaked plumage, which provides excellent camouflage in the open grasslands this bird favors. It is widely distributed around the world, with ten recognized subspecies. One of these, the Pueo, is Hawai’i’s only native owl.

Flying over open terrain and often active during the early morning and evening, the Short-eared Owl can take on a markedly ghost-like appearance. Usually silent, the bird flies close to the ground with deep, slow wing beats that give it a buoyant quality.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Gisela_Nagel-Fl-1619-Karmingimpel

Fulvous Whistling Ducks (Dendrocygna bicolor)

Kestrel incoming

Eastern Bluebird and young

Painted Bunting

SIERRA CLUB — NEW ZEALAND — Māui and Hector’s dolphin proposals not fit for extinction crisis world’s rarest dolphin species — CANYON WREN — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

SIERRA CLUB NEW ZEALAND

Māui and Hector’s dolphin proposals

not fit for extinction crisis.  

We must ban all gill netting and trawling from Māui habitat out to 100 metres immediately, but why aren’t the same protections being offered for Hector’s dolphins?  We know they are dying by the dozen in fishing nets but there is no equivalent proposal to stop those methods in Hector’s habitat.

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 106,000 photos and videos. 

CANYON WREN

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Catherpes mexicanus 
POPULATION: 310,000
TREND: Stable 
HABITAT: Rocky outcrops, cliffs, and canyons.

Male Canyon Wrens songs are composed of clear, descending notes – almost sounding as if the bird is tumbling headfirst into a chasm. Chances are good that a Canyon Wren that’s singing persistently and acting territorial is a male. The female sings much less frequently, usually in response to a male’s song; her song is buzzy and ascending.

Many think this species’ tumbling, echoing notes form one of the West’s most beautiful bird songs. Both males and females sing, although their tunes sound a bit different.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Fieldfare

Troupial at feeder

CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER at Fort De Soto Park, Saint Petersburg, Florida

Godwits at dusk

Collach Cormorant

BIRD OF THE WEEK — YELLOW-EARED PARROT — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 110,000 photo and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

YELLOW-EARED PARROT

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Ognorhynchus icterotis
POPULATION: ~ 4,251 Individuals
IUCN STATUS: Endangered
TREND: Increasing
HABITAT: Humid montane and elfin forest and adjacent partially cleared terrain; favors areas with wax palms.

The colorful, elusive Yellow-eared Parrot was considered by many to be a lost species until April 1999, when a group of researchers sponsored by ABC and Fundación Loro Parque discovered a group of 81 in the misty heights of the Colombian Andes.

Since this rediscovery, Yellow-eared Parrot numbers have rebounded due to intensive conservation, but like the Fuertes’s Parrot and Santa Marta Parakeet, this bird remains one of the most threatened parrot species in Colombia.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Lesser goldfinch at feeder

Dunnock Lurgangreen

Flame-faced Tanager

Am I beautiful?

Hard to compare with the beauty of Pierre the PAINTED BUNTING, Lakeland, Florida

ARARIPE MANAKIN — CRITICALLY ENDANGERED — FOG — PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE group

PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE has over 3,700 members and over 163,000 photos and videos. 

Contest — Reflections on Water

ARARIPE MANAKIN

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Antilophia bokermanni
POPULATION: About 800 adults
IUCN STATUS: Critically Endangered
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Lower and middle levels of tall, humid forest, with an abundance of vines.

The Araripe Manakin’s Critically Endangered status, which has led to its listing as an Alliance for Zero Extinction (AZE) species, has also focused attention on the importance of conserving its unique habitat. This habitat determines not only this bird’s continued survival but also the quality of life for thousands of people living in this largely impoverished region of northeastern Brazil.

Araripe Manakin, Ciro Albano

In 2003, the first information about the Araripe Manakin’s biology and threats to its survival were presented in a management plan aimed at local stakeholders. Just this year, the bird became the first species in Brazil to receive a National Conservation Action Plan. It is now a widely recognized symbol for biodiversity, natural resources conservation, and the importance of environmental sustainability.

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alexinatempaJohn KocijanskiSARK S-Wl4tsValt3r Rav3ra – DEVOted!

River Scene with Fog and Light

foggy_0369

Marécages

Emergence

Haze