CANUDOS BIOlOGICAL STATION, BRAZIL — ENDANGERED BIRDS — LEAR’S MACAW — PLANET EARTH IN SILHOUETTES group

PLANET EARTH IN SILHOUETTES has over 1,500 members and over 23,000 photos.

Protecting all birds across the Western Hemisphere, but 25 are a special focus for us. These birds range from the rare Marvelous Spatuletail of Peru to the wide-ranging Bobolink, a familiar but rapidly declining species.

The Canudos Biological Station, located in Brazil’s Bahia Department, is a pioneering initiative managed by Biodiversitas Foundation that protects one of the planet’s most endangered and admired birds, the Lear’s Macaw (EN). Thanks to focused conservation efforts, the species’ numbers have increased from a few dozen in the late 1980s to approximately 1,700 today. The 3,274-acre reserve is striking: Its sandstone canyons are weathered into odd forms, cloaked in Caatinga habitat with giant cacti and unique flora, including the Licuri Palm, an important food for the macaw.

 

Canudos Biological Station is one of our top birding destinations. Photo by Ciro Ginez Albano

 In addition to the Lear’s Macaw, you are likely to see other northeastern Brazil endemics, including the Broad-tipped Hermit (LC), Red-shouldered Spinetail (LC), and Cactus Parakeet (LC). Also, watch for the Black-bellied Antwren (LC), Barred Antshrike (LC), Red-legged Seriema (LC), and Blue-winged Macaw (NT), among others. In the evenings, a guide-led night walk might reveal the Rufous Nightjar (LC) and several owl species.

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BIRD OF THE WEEK — BARN SWALLOW — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group has over 1,500 members and over 101,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

BARN SWALLOW

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Hirundo rustica 
POPULATION: 41 million (Americas), 190 million (world)
TREND: Decreasing 
HABITAT: Breeds in open country including pastures, meadows, and farmland, often near water. Winters in a variety of open habitats.

No bird in North America is better known as a welcome companion and a useful friend to the farmer, as it courses  about the barnyard in pursuit of the troublesome insects that annoy both man and beast.

The Barn Swallow seems to benefit from life around people, as long as its prey remains abundant. The species is found around the world, as are the Short-eared OwlGolden EagleDunlin, and a handful of other bird species.

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BIRD CONSERVATION — Will Federal Policies Doom the Sage-Grouse to Extinction? — PLANET EARTH URBAN LANDSCAPES group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH URBAN LANDSCAPES has 1,000 members and over 41,000 photos and videos.

Wildlife experts concluded in 2015 that the Greater Sage-Grouse, an iconic bird of the West, did not require listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), thanks to then-new federal management plans with added conservation requirements. Many conservation groups, including American Bird Conservancy, supported the monumental process leading up to these plansand the decision not to list this species under these circumstances.

Greater Sage-Grouse. Photo by Pat Gaines/Flickr

As it turned out, had the beleaguered bird been listed in 2015, we wouldn’t now be watching years of effort to save the Greater Sage-Grouse be washed away almost overnight. The many promises to conserve the grouse and its habitat are now purposefully being abandoned as the federal agencies are on the verge of finalizing new plans that remove essential safeguards.

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BIRD OF THE WEEK — RED WINGED BLACKBIRD — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group has over 1,500 members and over 101,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Agelaius phoeniceus 
POPULATION: 150 million
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Breeds and winters in fresh and saltwater marshes; also meadows, prairies, and fields, especially near ditches or ponds.

The liquid, burbling “conk-a-ree!” of a male Red-winged Blackbird on territory is a sure sign of spring, or at least its pending arrival. This bird’s common name derives from the sleek black males’ distinctive shoulder patches, or epaulets, which flash red in flight and while the bird is singing on territory.

The Red-winged Blackbird belongs to the family Icteridae, which includes the Eastern MeadowlarkTricolored BlackbirdRusty Blackbird, and Baltimore Oriole.

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NEWS AND PERSPECTIVES ON BIRD CONSERVATION — BIOlOGICAL STATION, BRAZIL — DAISIES — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME is our flagship group with over 12,000 members and over 787,000 photos and videos.

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News and Perspectives on Bird Conservation

The Canudos Biological Station, located in Brazil’s Bahia Department, is a pioneering initiative managed by Biodiversitas Foundation that protects one of the planet’s most endangered and admired birds, the Lear’s Macaw (EN). Thanks to focused conservation efforts, the species’ numbers have increased from a few dozen in the late 1980s to approximately 1,700 today. The 3,274-acre reserve is striking: Its sandstone canyons are weathered into odd forms, cloaked in Caatinga habitat with giant cacti and unique flora, including the Licuri Palm, an important food for the macaw.

Canudos Biological Station is one of our top birding destinations. Photo by Ciro Ginez Albano

To see the Lear’s Macaw, go during the breeding season (March to May) and be prepared to rise before dawn. Guides at the reserve, employed from the local community, will lead you to see flocks of these large, noisy, dazzling blue birds as they flap past the dramatic red sandstone canyons where they roost and nest.

Learn more about visiting Canudos.

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