BIRD OF THE WEEK — CACTUS WREN — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLASTIC FREE NEW ZEALAND

Let’s end plastic pollution in Aotearoa

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 102,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

CACTUS WREN

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus
POPULATION: 3.1 million in United States; Mexican population likely as large.
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Resident in desert and arid scrublands from the southwestern United States to central Mexico.

The Cactus Wren is the largest wren found in the United States — about the size of a Spotted Towhee. Its curious nature and loud, chattering calls make this bird one of the most well-known species of the southwestern desert.

The Cactus Wren’s genus name Campylorhynchus derives from the Greek words for “curved beak.” Its species name brunneicapillus is formed from the Latin words for “brown” and “hair,” referring to this bird’s brown cap and back.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos

Singing chaffinch

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Who is more beautiful 🤔 Jerdon's Leaf Bird and Bombax ceiba flower

Pierre the PAINTED BUNTING

SONY ILVE-A9, Great White Egret, 2232, 1-1250, f8, ISO 1250, 100-400@ 256mm

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BIRD OF THE WEEK  — TOWNSEND’S WARBLER — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 104,000 photos and photos. 

AMERICAN BIRD CONSERVANCY

BIRD OF THE WEEK

TOWNSEND’S WARBLER

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Setophaga townsendi 
POPULATION: 20 million
TREND: Stable
HABITAT: Breeds in coniferous forest; winters along Pacific Coast and in Mexican and Central American highlands.

The striking black-and-yellow Townsend’s Warbler is named for American naturalist and collector John Kirk Townsend, who first described this bird in 1834 during an expedition crossing the Rockies to reach the Pacific Ocean.

The Townsend’s Warbler is part of a larger “superspecies” — a group of bird species that are closely related, but developed in geographic isolation from each other. The Townsend’s Warbler, along with the Hermit, Golden-cheeked

Black-throated Green, and Black-throated Gray Warblers, is considered part of the Black-throated Green superspecies, or virens group.

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Hocó Colorado (Tigrisoma lineatum)_RVL

Rock Bunting on Himalayan Scrub - Western Himalayas

Grote bonte specht

Stitchbird - hihi

Female House Sparrow

BIRD CONSERVATION — Will Federal Policies Doom the Sage-Grouse to Extinction? — PLANET EARTH URBAN LANDSCAPES group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH URBAN LANDSCAPES has 1,000 members and over 41,000 photos and videos.

Wildlife experts concluded in 2015 that the Greater Sage-Grouse, an iconic bird of the West, did not require listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), thanks to then-new federal management plans with added conservation requirements. Many conservation groups, including American Bird Conservancy, supported the monumental process leading up to these plansand the decision not to list this species under these circumstances.

Greater Sage-Grouse. Photo by Pat Gaines/Flickr

As it turned out, had the beleaguered bird been listed in 2015, we wouldn’t now be watching years of effort to save the Greater Sage-Grouse be washed away almost overnight. The many promises to conserve the grouse and its habitat are now purposefully being abandoned as the federal agencies are on the verge of finalizing new plans that remove essential safeguards.

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tango-Boris (architectural photography)Helmut ReicheltRafael Gomez – http://micamara.esRNRobert
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Bath landmarks

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shadows and gold

BIRD OF THE WEEK — SANDERLING — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 104,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

SANDERLING

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Calidris alba 
POPULATION: 300,000 (North America); global population unknown.
TREND: Unknown 
HABITAT: Breeds on high Arctic tundra; winters along sandy beaches, on tidal flats, and at the edges of lagoons.

Sanderlings are part of the shorebird family Scolopacidae, a wide-ranging and diverse group ranging from the Semipalmated Sandpiper and Red Knot to the Long-billed Curlew and American Woodcock.

Unlike other members of its family, the Sanderling lacks a hind toe, a modification that helps this bird run across sandy surfaces. The ability to run quickly and efficiently on sand is especially important to this species, which forages along the ocean’s edge.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Dot-winged Antwren II

Ovenbird Standing

Roodborsttapuit | Stonechat (Saxicola rubicola)

Cardinal (m) matches the maple buds

Green-backed Tit - Wesetern Himalayas ~1850m Altitude

BIRD OF THE WEEK — GRAY-BREASTED MOUNTAIN-TOUCAN — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 103,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

GRAY-BREASTED MOUNTAIN-TOUCAN

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Andigena hypoglauca 
POPULATION: Unknown
IUCN STATUS: Near Threatened
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Cloud forest in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru.

The colorful Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan inhabits chilly, damp, mountainous terrain, unlike its larger lowland relatives the Channel-billed and Keel-billed Toucans. In fact, its genus name Andigena means “coming from the Andes Mountains” — a nod to this toucan’s sloping habitat.

The Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan can be differentiated from the three other mountain-toucan species by its red-, yellow-, and black-banded bill and, in one subspecies, its piercing yellow eyes.

SONY-ILCE-A9, Bluebird,05806, 1-1600, f-9, ISO 1600, 100-400@560mm

Bath time

Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus)

Red-cheeked Cordon-bleu

Peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus