BIRD OF THE WEEK — CALLIOPE HUMMINGBIRD — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 109,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

CALLIOPE HUMMINGBIRD

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Selasphorus calliope 
POPULATION: 4.5 million
TREND: Stable 
HABITAT: Breeds in open forest and edge, scrub, and meadows at higher elevations in the of western North America; winters in thorn and pine-oak forests and shrubby edges in western Mexico.

The Calliope Hummingbird is a tiny wonder – at only around 3 inches long, it’s the smallest breeding bird in Canada and the United States, and the smallest long-distance migratory bird in the world.

Female Calliope Hummingbird feeding on colombine_Robert Mutch, Shutterstock

When a female Calliope Hummingbird perches within his territory, the resident male swings into courtship mode, hovering in front of his potential mate with iridescent throat feathers spread into a shining starburst. He also makes a loud buzzing noise during this flashy display. If the female is suitably impressed, she leaves her perch and joins the male in an aerial dance, with both birds circling each other, sometimes even clasping bills.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Roodborsttapuit | Stonechat (Saxicola rubicola)

Starting to accumulate

Yellowhammer

House Sparrow - male

Tree sparrow

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BIRD OF THE WEEK — PERUVIAN PLANTCUTTER — BOSQUE de POMAC NATIONAL SANCTUARY — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLASTIC FREE NEW ZEALAND

Let’s end plastic pollution in Aotearoa

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 109,000.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

PERUVIAN PLANTCUTTER

The Peruvian Plantcutter is a cotinga, part of a diverse group of Neotropical birds that includes the Long-wattled Umbrellabird, Palkachupa Cotinga, and Andean Cock-of-the-rock.

Female-Peruvian-Plantcutter-in-Tumbesian-habitat_Photo-by-Jean-Paul-Perret-and-Dan-Lebbin

The Peruvian Plantcutter has a short, conical bill like a Northern Cardinal’s, but with an important addition — serrated edges. These tooth-like ridges allow the plantcutter to chew vegetation into a pulp before swallowing, which is something quite rare in the bird world. Plus, this bird has extra-efficient intestines that process large amounts (for a songbird) of plant material in a short time.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
QT2A0293

Motacilla alba - White wagtail

Guinea Turaco

Mallards in flight

Ramassage de brindilles pour le nid

 

 

GREENPEACE — NEW ZEALAND — Māui and Hector’s dolphin proposals not fit for extinction crisis world’s rarest dolphin species — CANYON WREN — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

GREENPEACE NEW ZEALAND

Māui and Hector’s dolphin proposals

not fit for extinction crisis.

Greenpeace

We must ban all gill netting and trawling from Māui habitat out to 100 metres immediately, but why aren’t the same protections being offered for Hector’s dolphins?  We know they are dying by the dozen in fishing nets but there is no equivalent proposal to stop those methods in Hector’s habitat.

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 106,000 photos and videos. 

CANYON WREN

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Catherpes mexicanus 
POPULATION: 310,000
TREND: Stable 
HABITAT: Rocky outcrops, cliffs, and canyons.

Male Canyon Wrens songs are composed of clear, descending notes – almost sounding as if the bird is tumbling headfirst into a chasm. Chances are good that a Canyon Wren that’s singing persistently and acting territorial is a male. The female sings much less frequently, usually in response to a male’s song; her song is buzzy and ascending.

Many think this species’ tumbling, echoing notes form one of the West’s most beautiful bird songs. Both males and females sing, although their tunes sound a bit different.

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Fieldfare

Troupial at feeder

CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER at Fort De Soto Park, Saint Petersburg, Florida

Godwits at dusk

Collach Cormorant

BIRD OF THE WEEK — BARN SWALLOW — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group has over 1,500 members and over 108,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

BARN SWALLOW

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Hirundo rustica
POPULATION: 41 million (Americas), 190 million (world)
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Breeds in open country including pastures, meadows, and farmland, often near water. Winters in a variety of open habitats.

No bird in North America is better known as a welcome companion and a useful friend to the farmer, as it courses about the barnyard in pursuit of the troublesome insects that annoy both man and beast.

The Barn Swallow seems to benefit from life around people, as long as its prey remains abundant. The species is found around the world, as are the Short-eared Owl, Golden Eagle, Dunlin, and a handful of other bird species.

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Desert hummingbird

Pheasant

2019-01-24 House Finch (1024x680)

Goldcrest

Guianan Cock-of-the-rock

BIRD OF THE WEEK — AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 107,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Pluvialis dominica 
POPULATION: 200,000
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Nests on dry tundra; winters on grassy plains.

The American Golden-Plover is made for life on the wing, with an elegant, elongated shape set off by eye-catching breeding plumage of black and white with a gold-spangled back.

American Golden-Plover in winter plumage, Steve Byland, Shutterstock

While migrating, the American Golden-Plover forms large, noisy flocks. In the spring, groups make frequent pit stops to rest and refuel in a variety of habitats, including native prairies, farm fields, mudflats, shorelines, and estuaries.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER with Cuban Anole at Bok Tower Gardens, Lake Wales, Florida

Great Tit

Lille Flagspætte, Dendrocopos minor, Lesser Spotted Woodpecker

Young European Honey Buzzard

Red bellied woodpecker

Greenpeace