BIRD OF THE WEEK — AMERICAN KESTREL — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 107,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

AMERICAN KESTREL

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Falco sparverius 
POPULATION: 4 million; 2.5 million in the United States and Canada 
TREND: Declining throughout North America.
HABITAT: Open habitats such as grasslands, meadows, and deserts, close to suitable trees for nesting and perching.

About the size of a Blue Jay, the American Kestrel is the smallest falcon in North America. Common nicknames for this scrappy little raptor include “sparrow hawk” (after the distantly related Eurasian Sparrowhawk), “grasshopper hawk,” for one of its favorite prey items, and “killy hawk,” due to its shrill call.

American Kestrels have two black spots, known as ocelli(“little eyes” in Latin), at the back of their heads. These false “eyes” help protect this little falcon from potential attackers sneaking up from the rear, whether they are predators or mobbing songbirds. American Kestrels also have two vertical black facial markings on each side of the head, in contrast to most other falcon species, which only have one.

Top Contributors

DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Pitiguary, Cyclarhis gujanensis (Gmelin, 1789), Rufous-browed Peppershrike

Summer Tanager

House Finch (Male)

Piranga roja, Summer Tanager, Piranga rubra (macho-male)

Stitchbird - hihi

 

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BIRD OF THE WEEK — BAHAMA ORIOLE — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 106,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

BAHAMA ORIOLE

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Icterus northropi 
POPULATION: Fewer than 300 individuals.
IUCN STATUS: Critically Endangered 
TREND: Decreasing 
HABITAT: Broadleaf and pine forests and edges; will use human-altered habitats.

The dashing Bahama Oriole has shiny black plumage and bright lemon-yellow on its belly, wings, and rump. Unlike the related Baltimore Oriole, male and female Bahama Orioles are very similar in appearance. Found only on the Andros Islands in the Bahamas, fewer than 300 individuals are thought to remain.

This rare oriole belongs to the New World blackbird family, which includes the Audubon’s Oriole and the Red-winged Blackbird.

Top Contributors

DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
song thrush

Robin

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It's the berries!

Young Goldfinch

HAWAII IS THE BIRD EXTINCTION CAPITAL OF THE WORLD — PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES has over 7,000 members and over 287,000 photos and videos. 

Contest — Open Spaces

Since humans arrived, 95 of 142 bird species found nowhere else have become extinct on Hawaii. Thirty-three of Hawaii’s remaining 44 endemic birds are listed under the Endangered Species Act; ten of those have not been seen for decades and are likely extinct.

AKIKIKI A BIRD IN NEED

 ABC’s Hawaii Program has made the conservation of the ‘Akikiki and other forest birds one of its top priorities.

Troubled Times on the Hawaiian Islands:

Mosquito-borne diseases such as avian malaria and avian pox have decimated ‘Akikiki populations. The problem may worsen, as climate change could continue to raise the elevation where mosquitoes can live, further shrinking this bird’s habitat.

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tango-stumbleonl4tsRNRobertMicheline Canal
Windy summer sky

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Foreshortening of Bergamo Alta

Reflejo del Otoño

Sunset in Buarcos beach. Cabo Mondego, Figueira da Foz

BIRD OF THE WEEK — GRAY-BREASTED MOUNTAIN-TOUCAN — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 103,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

GRAY-BREASTED MOUNTAIN-TOUCAN

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Andigena hypoglauca 
POPULATION: Unknown
IUCN STATUS: Near Threatened
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Cloud forest in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru.

The colorful Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan inhabits chilly, damp, mountainous terrain, unlike its larger lowland relatives the Channel-billed and Keel-billed Toucans. In fact, its genus name Andigena means “coming from the Andes Mountains” — a nod to this toucan’s sloping habitat.

The Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan can be differentiated from the three other mountain-toucan species by its red-, yellow-, and black-banded bill and, in one subspecies, its piercing yellow eyes.

SONY-ILCE-A9, Bluebird,05806, 1-1600, f-9, ISO 1600, 100-400@560mm

Bath time

Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus)

Red-cheeked Cordon-bleu

Peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus

Stresemann’s Bristlefront — Critically Endangered — PLANET EARTH FLOWERS group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH FLOWERS has over 1,500 members and over 106,000 photos.

Stresemann’s Bristlefront — Critically Endangered

Estimated population: One known individual

IUCN Status: Critically Endangered

Location: Bahia State, Brazil

Perhaps the world’s rarest bird, only one Stresemann’s Bristlefront is known to survive in the wild. Unfortunately, this bird is confined to one of the most fragmented and degraded – and vulnerable – forests in the Americas.

Stresemann's Bristlefront ranks among the rarest of birds. Photo by Ciro Albano

After a 50-year disappearance, Stresemann’s Bristlefront was rediscovered in 1995. In 2007, ABC supported the creation of the Songbird Forest Reserve to protect its remaining habitat. However, following a severe drought and a series of fires in 2016, the bird once again disappeared. Efforts to re-locate the bird proved successful when a single female bristlefront was found in December of 2018.

Top Contributors

DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
White-throated Kingfishers: courtship dance

Long-tailed tit

superb fruit dove male

Fantail - Showing those beautiful tail feathers

Skulking Chinese hwamei