GREENPEACE — SCIENTISTS SOUND ALARM ABOUT “DESTRUCTIVE” DEEP SEA MINING — PLANET EARTH UNDERWATER group

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Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH UNDERWATER has over 1,000 members and over 40,000 photos and videos.

GREENPEACE

Kingston, Jamaica – Marine scientists from around the world have issued a stark warning about the emerging industry of deep sea mining, stating that its development “puts the overall health of ocean ecosystems under threat” and could contribute to climate breakdown. [1] Greenpeace activists went to the International Seabed Authority (ISA) annual meeting in Kingston, joined by the members of Jamaica Environment Trust and representatives of several other Jamaican civil society organizations, to deliver a  letter of concern by 28 scientists from eight countries to the participants of the meeting. A banner was unfurled at the event which said “No deep sea mining” as Greenpeace demands protection of the sea bed and global oceans.

Esperanza in Jamaica with Banner © Bárbara Sánchez Palomero / Greenpeace

Activists from around the world have sailed on board the Greenpeace ship Esperanza, to join in a peaceful assembly in front of one of the battlegrounds for protecting the deep oceans from monster mining machines: the International Seabed Authority (ISA), which is hosting its 25th Assembly in Kingston, Jamaica.

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SIERRA CLUB CANADA — TWO ONTARIO NATIVE COMMUNITIES ON FRONT LINES TO AVERT CLIMATE CHANGE DISASTER — PLANET EARTH IN SILHOUETTES group

PLANET EARTH IN SILHOUETTES has over 1,400 members and over 24,000 photos. 

The Objiway community of Eabametoong and Cree of Nestantaga in northern Ontario have found themselves on the front lines to avert catastrophe from climate change. They are anticipating a three-year struggle to oppose two new roads planned to accommodate mines in what has become known as Ontario’s Ring of Fire. The battle takes place via co-ordinated federal and provincial Environmental Assessments (EAs).

The primary way to prevent environmentally destructive mining in the James Bay Lowlands Ring of Fire is through EAs for proposed roads. Our antiquated mining laws (from the 19thcentury) exempt mines themselves from EA review.

Part of the reason for the opposition from the Eabametoong and Nestantaga First Nations is that until shortly before the last provincial election Ontario planned a more comprehensive environmental study for the entire Ring of Fire region. Now the Province has switched to isolated EA’s for roads as its only commitment to preventing damage to the environment and accelerating climate change.

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SIERRA CLUB — PLASTIC POLLUTION — LIGHTNING STRIKES — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME is our flagship group with over 12,000 members and over 824,000 photos and videos.

Contest #1 — Roses

Contest #2 — Your Favorite Bird

Contest #3 — Carts Buggies Sleighs and Wagons

More and more people are confronting the ways that plastic, a product of fossil fuels, cause harm. From municipal bans on various kinds of single use plastics, to restaurants switching to paper straws, to stores encouraging customers to bring their own bags, the era of single-use plastics in our everyday lives is one that needs to be relegated to the past — and quickly.

Stop Corporate Green-Washing On Plastic!

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SIERRA CLUB — WE’RE ON TRACK TO MOVE BEYOND COAL — MICROBIOLOGY — PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD group

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Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD has over 1,600 members and over 92,000 photos and videos.

Cause for Hope: We’re On Track to Move Beyond Coal:

If you’re alarmed or distressed by the major new climate findings released this week, I have good news to restore your hope and pull you back from the edge of despair. But first, in case you missed the headlines, the major scientific analysis released this weekend by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is a staggering wake-up call to action on climate.

coal retirement rate

When we do that, we will not only maintain America’s leadership in the world but also continue the shift in the marketplace toward clean, renewable energy, which is already accessible and cheaper than coal in places all over the country and the globe. Getting off of coal and fossil fuels doesn’t just help curb the climate crisis, it saves lives and saves money by cutting toxic pollution from coal plants that makes people sick and drives up medical costs.

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SIERRA CLUB — BUMBLEBEES NEED A DIVERSE DIET TOO — SEPIA PHOTOGRAPHY — PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES group

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Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

 

PLANET EARTH LANDSCAPES has over 7,000 members and over 308,000 photos and videos.

Queen honeybees have a pretty cushy life. Living inside the hive, worker bees take care of most tasks like collecting pollen and nectar, producing honey, and fixing up the hive. But that’s not the case for queen bumblebees. For most of their life, the fuzzy, fat, black-and-yellow bees in the genus Bombus fly solo and have to fatten up after hibernation, found a colony, and raise a batch of baby workers before they get a day off. Those weeks as a single mother are perilous for bumblebees, which rely on early-blooming flowers to survive the spring. A new study shows that the more diverse the flowers the queen bees can access, the better off the bees are in the long run.

Unlike queen honeybees, Apis mellifera, which can live for years and overwinter in their hives, the bumblebee life cycle is annual. In the fall, after mating with a male drone, new queen bumblebees dig a cavity in the ground to overwinter. When they emerge in the spring, it’s their job to find a new nest site, which can be a cavity in a tree, a hole in the ground, or even a nice tussock of grass. But searching for real estate is hard work, and the bees need to eat flower pollen for protein and sip nectar for sugar as they go about their business.

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