SIERRA CLUB — BIOLOGICAL CONTROLS OF NON-NATIVE INVASIVE PLANTS — MACRO WORLD — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME is our flagship group with over 12,000 members and over 819,000 photos and videos.

Contest #1- Transportation

Contest #2- Your Favorite Bird

Contest #3 — Horses

Maryland Chapter chapter logo

garlic mustard

Of the 15 top non-native invasive plant species in the mid-Atlantic region four (Purple Loosestrife, Mile-a-minute, Japanese Knotweed, and Garlic Mustard) now have one or two non-native insects or fungi that feed on them being released that are host specific and effective. Since the new rules of proving host specificity went into effect about 20 years ago, the problem of bio-controls harming non-target organisms has gone down to 3% of its earlier rate. With adequate research we can find bio-controls for about 30 percent of our non-native invasive plant species and reduce our work for traditional removal of non-native species by labor-intensive cut, pull and spray.

Top Contributors

John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)alpenglowtravelersDiegojack–MARCO POLO–tucker.tterence

whisps in the wind

Mushroom Family

V068_MPC 3538

Wish I Could Fly (II)

Azuré des Nerpruns / 瑠璃蜆 Hermagis Paris Anastigmat Hellor 1:4.5 F 105m/m

NEW ZEALAND — TASMAN SEA –ANDREAS KAY PHOTOGRAPHY — PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 87,000 photos and videos.

Right now, the New Zealand bottom trawling fleet is setting out for yet another season of destruction. Each year, out of sight, the NZ fishing fleet go on the hunt for orange roughy using one of the most destructive forms of fishing ever devised. They have to be stopped, and one of the first things we need to do is make people aware of what’s really going on out there.

New Zealand trawl fleet to continue destruction of deep-sea ecosystems 
in South Pacific on the high seas.

New Zealand and Australia to adopt a deeply flawed regulation that will allow continued degradation and destruction of biologically rich and diverse ecosystems in the deep-sea from the Louisville Ridge in the western central South Pacific all the way across to the Tasman Sea.

We’ve stopped environmental crimes in the past and held companies to account. Together in our thousands, we’re forcing change and seeing results.

More and more people are saying ‘no’ to trashing the oceans, forests and climate – and standing up to protect our air, land and water from pollution.

Top Contributors

John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)deta kEcuador Megadiversoorb1806Hugo von Schreck Nursery web spider, Thaumasia sp., Pisauridae Small Minnow Mayfly, Baetodes sp.? Baetidae Treefrog, Agalychnis hulli Orchid bees, Eufriesea sp. (ID by Marco Gaiani), Euglossini collecting bark containing perfumes to attract females? Dewlap of the Equatorial Anole, Anolis aequatorialis

SIERRA CLUB — MASSIVE MILKWEED RESTORATION COULD HELP SAVE THE MONARCH BUTTERFLY — PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD has over 1,600 members and over 92,000 photos and videos. 

MILKWEED RESTORATION

Common milkweed isn’t a particularly finicky plant—it has “weed” in its name for a reason and can be found growing on roadsides, empty lots, and old fields. But over the last two decades, Asclepias syriaca, which is primarily found in the Midwest and eastern United States, has disappeared from most agricultural landscapes. Along with it, the population of the iconic migratory monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus plexippus, which relies on the plant for reproduction, has also crashed, so much so that it is being considered for endangered status.

According to researchers, 1.3 billion stems of milkweed have disappeared from Midwestern farmlands over the last 20 years. This has led to an 80 percent crash in the migratory monarch, which winters in the mountains of Mexico and breeds in the central and eastern United States during the spring and summer. Since hitting an estimated high of 682 million monarchs in 1997, the species dropped to just 42 million in 2015. According to another study, milkweed in and near cropland in Illinois, prime monarch habitat, has dropped by 95 percent over the same period—representing a 50 percent drop in the total milkweed population.

Top Contributors

John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)deta kIn Memoriam: Ecuador Megadiversoorb1806Hugo von Schreck
1671

EL ANCLA DE CEPHALODELLA, TURBERAS DE HOYOS DE IREGUA.

Dahlia

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7-15-2019 blue flower with bee-45

SIERRA CLUB — EXXON AND TAR SANDS GO ON TRIAL — MACRO WORLD — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME is our flagship group with over 12,000 members and over 812,000 photos and videos.

Contest — Your Favorite Flower

In late 2013, Exxon Mobil faced increasing pressure from investors to disclose more about the risks the company faced as governments began limiting greenhouse gas emissions. Of the many costs climate change will impose, oil companies face a particularly acute one: the demand for their product will have to shrink.

For years, Exxon had been using something called a proxy cost of carbon to estimate what stricter climate policies might mean for its bottom line. But as pressure from shareholders grew, a problem came sharply into focus: An internal presentation warned top executives that the way the company had been applying this proxy cost was potentially misleading. That’s because Exxon didn’t have one projected cost of carbon. It had two.

Top Contributors

John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)alpenglowtravelersDiegojack–MARCO POLO–tucker.tterence
Garden Reflections

Water droplets

Jacinthe des Bois Angénieux 75mm F 3.5 Type X1

Myosotis Angénieux 100mm F 3.5

Flor-472

NEW ZEALAND — TASMAN SEA –ANDREAS KAY PHOTOGRAPHY — PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD group

PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 87,000 photos and videos.

 

Right now, the New Zealand bottom trawling fleet is setting out for yet another season of destruction. Each year, out of sight, the NZ fishing fleet go on the hunt for orange roughy using one of the most destructive forms of fishing ever devised. They have to be stopped, and one of the first things we need to do is make people aware of what’s really going on out there.

New Zealand trawl fleet to continue destruction of deep-sea ecosystems 
in South Pacific on the high seas.

New Zealand and Australia to adopt a deeply flawed regulation that will allow continued degradation and destruction of biologically rich and diverse ecosystems in the deep-sea from the Louisville Ridge in the western central South Pacific all the way across to the Tasman Sea.

We’ve stopped environmental crimes in the past and held companies to account. Together in our thousands, we’re forcing change and seeing results.

More and more people are saying ‘no’ to trashing the oceans, forests and climate – and standing up to protect our air, land and water from pollution.

Top Contributors

John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)deta kEcuador Megadiversoorb1806Hugo von Schreck
Nursery web spider, Thaumasia sp., Pisauridae

Small Minnow Mayfly, Baetodes sp.? Baetidae

Treefrog, Agalychnis hulli

Orchid bees, Eufriesea sp. (ID by Marco Gaiani), Euglossini collecting bark containing perfumes to attract females?

Dewlap of the Equatorial Anole, Anolis aequatorialis