BIRD OF THE WEEK — BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETREL — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and 96,000 photos and videos. 

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BIRD OF THE WEEK

BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETREL

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Oceanodroma castro 
POPULATION: Global population: 150,000 individuals; Hawaiian population: approximately 240 pairs
TREND: Decreasing 
HABITAT: Nests on isolated islands; spends rest of time at sea.

The dainty Band-rumped Storm-Petrel, known as the ‘Ake‘ake in Hawai’i, is named for the white band across the top of its broad, squared-tipped tail. Its genus name, Oceanodroma, derives from the ancient Greek words for “ocean” and “runner,” probably derived from the bird’s habit of paddling with its feet while it flies low over the water.

Band-rumped Storm-Petrel, Mike Danzenbaker

A full-grown Band-rumped Storm-Petrel weighs only about one-and-a-half ounces — about the same as a golf ball. It’s similar in size to an American Robin.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
anu-preto (Crotophaga ani)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Tweety//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Daurian redstart//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Saíra-sete-cores, Tangara seledon, Statius Muller 1776, Green-headed Tanager//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

This NORTHERN CARDINAL works hard to get the seeds out of the little "Bean-pod" at Circle B Bar Reserve, Lakeland, Florida//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

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Save Habitat, Save Birds — PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE group

PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE has over 3,700 members and over 155,000 photos.

Contest — Urban Landscapes

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Creating nature reserves is one of the most important ways to save rare birds like Blue-billed Curassow and benefit migratory birds like Cerulean Warbler—along with an abundance of other biodiversity.

Crowned-Woodnymph_Martin-Mecnarowski_SS

Rio Canande Reserve, managed protects more than 6,100 acres of forest in the highly threatened Chocó region of northwestern Ecuador. About 25 percent of the species found in this region are found nowhere else on Earth, including Long-wattled Umbrellabird (shown); many declining species, like Scarlet-breasted Dacnis, also find refuge here.

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alexinatempaJohn KocijanskiSARK S-Wl4tsValt3r Rav3ra – DEVOted!
Joan's Angel//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

the search...//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

From the Archives - Frozen Falls//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Squabbling//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Wings//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

BIRD OF THE WEEK — CHILEAN WOODSTAR — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,400 members and over 91,000 photos and videos.

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BIRD OF THE WEEK

CHILEAN WOODSTAR

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Eulidia yarrellii
POPULATION: 350-500 individuals
IUCN STATUS: Endangered
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Native scrub in Chilean desert river valleys.

The beautiful Chilean Woodstar is a tiny hummingbird, only the size of a large moth. At around 3 inches long, it’s the smallest bird in Chile. The species has a very small distribution, too, and is as endangered as its close relative, the Esmeraldas Woodstar of Ecuador.

Habitat loss is the key factor behind the species’ decline from at least 1,500 birds in 2003 to roughly 400 birds in 2012 — a loss of more than 80 percent.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
purple Honeycreeper Cyanerpus Caeruleus//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

140A4026//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Jerdon's Leafbird.//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Saí-azul "macho" (Dacnis cayana).//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

IMG_9302//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

BIRD OF THE WEEK — AUDUBON’S ORIOLE — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 96,000 photos and videos.

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BIRD OF THE WEEK

AUDUBON’S ORIOLE

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Icterus graduacauda 
POPULATION: Fewer than 5,000 in U.S., but most of range is in Mexico.
TREND: Decreasing 
HABITAT: Riparian and live-oak woods.

Formerly known as the Black-headed Oriole, the flashy but furtive Audubon’s Oriole is one of North America’s two yellow-and-black orioles. (The other is Scott’s Oriole, also found in the U.S. Southwest and Mexico.) Audubon’s Oriole, like the Green Jay, is a species sought after by birders visiting Texas’ Lower Rio Grande Valley.

Although as brightly colored as a Green Jay or Painted Bunting, this large oriole can be a challenge to spot. Bright yellow is often difficult to distinguish amid green foliage, and unlike the more familiar Baltimore Oriole, Audubon’s Oriole tends to remain deep under cover, where it is more often heard than seen.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Pimpelmees//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Lamprotornis superbus//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

GOLDFINCH//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

"Green Honeycreeper - Male"//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Red-bellied Woodpecker ♂ - Pic à ventre roux ♂ - Melanerpes carolinus (D72_7169-Ladb-20171115)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

BIRD OF THE WEEK — WHITE-TAILED TROPICBIRD — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,400 member and over 91,000 photos and videos.

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BIRD OF THE WEEK

WHITE-TAILED TROPICBIRD

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Phaethon lepturus 
POPULATION: Unknown
TREND: Declining
HABITAT: Breeds on tropical islands; spends most of its life at sea.

The species is widespread in the tropics, found as five subspecies around the world. With long, narrow wings and an aerodynamic shape, this bird can remain in flight for long periods of time.

Sailors sometimes refer to tropicbirds as “bosun” (boatswain) birds because of their shrill, repeated calls, thought to resemble a boatswain’s whistle.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
INDIGO BUNTING at Fort DeSoto Park//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Alpenstrandläufer//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Blue-breasted Bee-eater / blauwborstbijeneter//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Phaeomyias murina//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Red-Mantled Rosefinch (Carpodacus rhodochlamys)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js