BIRD OF THE WEEK — RUSTY BLACKBIRD — BYE, BYE BLACKBIRD — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 98,000 photos and videos.

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BIRD OF THE WEEK

Rusty Blackbird

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Euphagus carolinus

POPULATION: Estimates vary widely, from less than 1 million to more than 5 million.

IUCN STATUS: Vulnerable

TREND: Decreasing

HABITAT: Breeds where boreal forest meets wetland. Winters in wooded wetlands.

Rusty Blackbird lost between 85 and 95 percent of its population, making it one of the fastest declining North American landbirds. The only North American blackbird more troubled is the Tricolored Blackbird, a localized and declining bird of West Coast wetlands.

usty Blackbird_Paul Roedding, Shutterstock

At first blush, the Rusty Blackbird’s growing scarcity makes no sense. After all, much of the bird’s breeding range in the boreal forest is remote and roadless, so human impact seems a less likely factor than in areas with cities and suburbs.

For now, scientists strongly suspect a few factors at play in the bird’s decline:

  • Climate change, which may cause wetlands to dry up more frequently, and also may throw off peak times for aquatic and other insects, affecting blackbird breeding.

  • Destruction of wetlands for agriculture in the United States wintering range, combined with degradation of remaining habitat.

  • A combination of these and other threats, including the poisoning of blackbird flocks and infiltration of Red-winged Blackbirds and Common Grackles into degraded habitats, where these birds likely compete with Rusty Blackbirds.

Top Contributors

DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos

102917074201asmweb//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

For ID (Done): Rusty Blackbird ♂ - Quiscale rouilleux ♂ - Euphagus carolinus (D72_6582-1F-20171003)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

110418177561asmweb//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Blackbird//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Blackbird//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

BIRD OF THE WEEK — AUDUBON’S ORIOLE — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 96,000 photos and videos.

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BIRD OF THE WEEK

AUDUBON’S ORIOLE

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Icterus graduacauda 
POPULATION: Fewer than 5,000 in U.S., but most of range is in Mexico.
TREND: Decreasing 
HABITAT: Riparian and live-oak woods.

Formerly known as the Black-headed Oriole, the flashy but furtive Audubon’s Oriole is one of North America’s two yellow-and-black orioles. (The other is Scott’s Oriole, also found in the U.S. Southwest and Mexico.) Audubon’s Oriole, like the Green Jay, is a species sought after by birders visiting Texas’ Lower Rio Grande Valley.

Although as brightly colored as a Green Jay or Painted Bunting, this large oriole can be a challenge to spot. Bright yellow is often difficult to distinguish amid green foliage, and unlike the more familiar Baltimore Oriole, Audubon’s Oriole tends to remain deep under cover, where it is more often heard than seen.

 

Top ContributorsDansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Pimpelmees//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Lamprotornis superbus//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

GOLDFINCH//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

"Green Honeycreeper - Male"//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Red-bellied Woodpecker ♂ - Pic à ventre roux ♂ - Melanerpes carolinus (D72_7169-Ladb-20171115)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

BIRD OF THE WEEK — BLUE-EYED GROUND DOVE — With a population estimated at just 16 birds, the Blue-eyed Ground-Dove is one of the rarest birds in Brazil — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 97,000 photos and videos. 

 

BIRD OF THE WEEK — BLUE-EYED GROUND DOVE

With a population estimated at just 16 birds, the Blue-eyed Ground-Dove is one of the rarest birds in Brazil, a country that’s home to many rare species found nowhere else.

This small dove is named for its vivid blue eyes, which match the spots on its wings and contrast with the rest of its rich tawny and rufous plumage.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Saw Whet Owl//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Serin//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

"Jump, and you will find out how to unfold your wings as you fall."//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Pipit V Insect//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Yellow Wagtail in a tulip field//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR REFUGEES (UNHCR) — CARDINALS — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME has over 12,000 members and over 750,000 photos and videos.

All PLANET EARTH groups supports UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR REFUGEES (UNHCR)

Rohingya refugee emergency at a glance.

Approximately 671,000 Rohingya refugees have fled targeted violence and serious human rights violations in Myanmar since August 2017. Many walked for days through the forest to reach safety in Bangladesh.

Six months on, the monsoon season is approaching and the risk of an emergency within the emergency is still looming. UNHCR, the Government of Bangladesh, and partners continue to work around the clock to provide protection and assistance to refugees, while also supporting host populations affected by the influx.

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John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)alpenglowtravelersDiegojack–MARCO POLO–tucker.tterence

Handsome Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinal//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Cardinal//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Female Northern Cardinal//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

MAUI, CARDINAL (CAME FROM SOUTH AMERICA IN THE '60S.)//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

BIRD OF THE WEEK — PINE SISKIN — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 97,000 photos and videos.

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BIRD OF THE WEEK

PINE SISKIN

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Spinus pinus 
POPULATION: 35 million
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Coniferous and mixed forests, alder thickets, and brushy pastures.

The streaky brown Pine Siskin is a “goldfinch in disguise,” with only touches of the bright yellow plumage worn by its close relatives, the American Goldfinch and Brazil’s Yellow-faced Siskin. 

This species is one of the most common of the “winter finches,” a group of birds such as the Evening Grosbeak that sometimes wander far south of their usual wintering grounds. 

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Cedar Waxwing//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

RGP_7329-3//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Macaw//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Mésange charbonnière et couleurs d'automne//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Thamnophilus multistriatus//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js