BIRD OF THE WEEK — IVORY-BILLED WOODPECKER — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 106,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

IVORY-BILLED WOODPECKER

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Campephilus principalis
POPULATION: Unknown
IUCN STATUS: Critically Endangered
TREND: Probably extinct
HABITAT: Hardwood swamps and pine forests.

The largest of its tribe in the United States, the impressive Ivory-billed Woodpecker was also called the “Lord God Bird,” after the typical reaction of people who saw it swoop into view. This charismatic species inhabited untouched bottomlands and swamps that once stretched across the southeastern United States.

The Ivory-billed Woodpecker was never a common bird, since it depended upon enormous, unbroken expanses of southern swamps providing the space and food it needed to thrive. Once its habitat began to disappear due to uncontrolled logging, the woodpecker became increasingly scarce. It was frequently shot by hunters and collectors, which likely contributed to its disappearance.

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Watch the Birdie

Great Blue Heron building the nest.

Cassin's Finch, female

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Untitled

Greenpeace USA

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ENDANGERED — MANGROVE HUMMINGBIRD — HDR — PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE has over 3,700 members and over 158,000 photos.

Contest Your Favorite Photo (Sepia Is Welcome)

MANGROVE HUMMINGBIRD

The species’ limited range and declining numbers have led the International Union for Conservation of Nature to classify the Mangrove Hummingbird as Endangered.

Birders and ecotourists can visit the Osa to see the Mangrove Hummingbird and other birds found nowhere else. Visit Conservation Birding to learn more.

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alexinatempaJohn KocijanskiSARK S-Wl4tsValt3r Rav3ra – DEVOted!
Under a cloudy sky

Herrgottswinkel in der Stube

Dandelion 2

Graphical Landscape

SHELL: MILWAUKEE PLANT

GREENPEACE — NEW ZEALAND — Māui and Hector’s dolphin proposals not fit for extinction crisis world’s rarest dolphin species — BIRD OF THE WEEK –CANYON WREN — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

GREENPEACE NEW ZEALAND

Māui and Hector’s dolphin proposals not fit for extinction crisis.

Greenpeace

We must ban all gill netting and trawling from Māui habitat out to 100 metres immediately, but why aren’t the same protections being offered for Hector’s dolphins?  We know they are dying by the dozen in fishing nets but there is no equivalent proposal to stop those methods in Hector’s habitat.

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 106,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

CANYON WREN

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Catherpes mexicanus 
POPULATION: 310,000
TREND: Stable 
HABITAT: Rocky outcrops, cliffs, and canyons.

Male Canyon Wrens songs are composed of clear, descending notes – almost sounding as if the bird is tumbling headfirst into a chasm. Chances are good that a Canyon Wren that’s singing persistently and acting territorial is a male. The female sings much less frequently, usually in response to a male’s song; her song is buzzy and ascending.

Many think this species’ tumbling, echoing notes form one of the West’s most beautiful bird songs. Both males and females sing, although their tunes sound a bit different.

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Fieldfare

Troupial at feeder

CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER at Fort De Soto Park, Saint Petersburg, Florida

Godwits at dusk

Collach Cormorant

CACTUS WREN — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLASTIC FREE NEW ZEALAND

Let’s end plastic pollution in Aotearoa

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 102,000 photos and videos. 

CACTUS WREN

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus
POPULATION: 3.1 million in United States; Mexican population likely as large.
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Resident in desert and arid scrublands from the southwestern United States to central Mexico.

The Cactus Wren is the largest wren found in the United States — about the size of a Spotted Towhee. Its curious nature and loud, chattering calls make this bird one of the most well-known species of the southwestern desert.

The Cactus Wren’s genus name Campylorhynchus derives from the Greek words for “curved beak.” Its species name brunneicapillus is formed from the Latin words for “brown” and “hair,” referring to this bird’s brown cap and back.

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Singing chaffinch

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Who is more beautiful 🤔 Jerdon's Leaf Bird and Bombax ceiba flower

Pierre the PAINTED BUNTING

SONY ILVE-A9, Great White Egret, 2232, 1-1250, f8, ISO 1250, 100-400@ 256mm

BIRD OF THE WEEK — RED-SHOULDERED HAWK — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 106,000 photos and videos. 

Greenpeace

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BIRD OF THE WEEK

RED-SHOULDERED HAWK

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Buteo lineatus
POPULATION: 1.6 million
TREND: Stable
HABITAT: Deciduous or mixed forests, often near clearings and water; swamps.

The Red-shouldered Hawk is named for its reddish upper wing coverts, or shoulders. The lineatus in its name means “striped” in Latin, referring to its black-and-white-banded tail and finely barred reddish breast. Another distinctive field mark: translucent wing crescents, or “windows,” near the base of the wingtips, visible when the bird soars or glides overhead.

This attractive raptor is smaller and slimmer than the more widespread Red-tailed Hawk, almost resembling an accipiter such as the Cooper’s Hawk.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Eye on the Search

Appelvink / Coccothraustes coccothraustus

Cassin's Finch

Tui

Fluffy Blue Tit

Greenpeace