BIRD OF THE WEEK — RARE BIRD — SHORT-CRESTED COQUETTE — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 113,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

SHORT-CRESTED COQUETTE

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Lophornis brachylophus
POPULATION: 250-999
IUCN STATUS: Critically Endangered
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Cloud forest, pine-oak forests and edges, coffee plantations.

The Short-crested Coquette is an incredibly small hummingbird – at less than three inches long, it’s barely the size of a butterfly! This is one of the rarest Mexican hummingbirds, with an extremely limited range in the state of Guerrero.

Short-crested Coquette, Greg Homel_Natural Elements Productions

Coquettes may be small, but they are among the showiest hummingbirds, with males having spiky crests and cheek tufts. Their common names hint at their gaudiness. Of the ten species, including Tufted, Dot-eared, Spangled, Peacock, Festive, and Frilled Coquettes, the rarest by far is the Short-crested.

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PAINTED BUNTING

Blue tit in the wind

Robin Feathers

SONY-ILCE-A9, Wood Storks, 02074 ,July 28, 2019

Kestrel incoming

SIERRA CLUB — 3 BILLION BIRDS ACROSS MANY SPECIES HAVE DISAPPEARED IN NORTH AMERICAN — PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH IN BLACK AND WHITE has over 3,700 members and over 162,000 photos.

Contest — Your Favorite Photography

Over the past 50 years, the conservation movement in North America has famously helped protect some of the most iconic birds from extinction, including bald eagles, wild turkeys, white pelicans, peregrine falcons, Kirtland’s warblers, and California condors. But a new study in the journal Science shows that while those rare birds were recovering, total bird numbers were plummeting, even among some of the most common backyard species.

The researchers found broad population decreases, not just with rare or threatened birds. “We saw that these losses occurred in the common species and across every habitat,” Rosenberg says. “Even birds we were calling generalists that should be well-adapted to human environments were in decline. Starlings and house sparrows, these invasive species that we thought may be taking over, were showing the same declines.

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A watch of a blow through. (FUJIFILM GFX50R shot)

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Cell Generation

no.907

Giraffes on holiday spend the day exploring Manhattan

HAWAII’S ENDANGERED PALILA — FLOWERS — PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD has over 1,600 members and over 92,000 photos and videos. 

The beautiful, liquid song of the Palila was once thought a sign of rain. Now the distinctive sound is rarely heard.

The Palila and the māmane tree are two of Hawai’i’s many species found nowhere else. The tree is essential to the bird: The Palila’s hooked bill is just right for opening the tough, fibrous seedpods of māmane, the bird’s primary food.

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Emergence of a Memory

The Butterfly's World

Details

Honey Bee Landing On A Burgundy Bee Balm Flower Macro Taken With A Samsung S10 Smartphone 20190812_141159

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Hundreds of bird species are on a track toward extinction. If these species blink out, we’ll have just one species to blame: ours — Marvelous Spatuletail — PLANET EARTH FLOWERS group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH FLOWERS has over 2,000 members and over 87,000 photos and videos.

The male Marvelous Spatuletail is a striking, high-energy spectacle, brandishing the purplish-blue spatules on its tail like a pair of castanets.

The birds wave these spatules around during communal courtship displays, which draw visiting females to observe and select a mate.

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BIRD OF THE WEEK — KING EIDER — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 113,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

King Eider

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Somateria spectabilis
POPULATION: 4.5 million
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Nests near freshwater lakes and ponds; winters along rocky coasts and on open ocean.

The King Eider’s species name spectabilis is Latin for “remarkable display,” referring to the drake, or adult male, in its breeding plumage. During that time, the drake is unmistakable, with powder-blue head and neck, light green cheek, orange-yellow frontal lobe outlined in black, and a red bill.

King Eider pair. Rob Kempers/Shutterstock.

The female eider sits tightly on her eggs and sometimes can be approached very closely. Females are so faithful to their nests that they sometimes go a week or more without feeding, and thus may lose significant amounts of weight while incubating.

 

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Chloris chloris - European greenfinch

Dunnock

2E2A5742

Bombycilla garrulus

Head on