BIRD OF THE WEEK — BLUE JAY — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 108,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

BLUE JAY

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Cyanocitta cristata
POPULATION: 17 million
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Forest edges, open woodlands, suburbs and cities with large, nut-bearing trees.

A member of the Corvid family, related to the Common Raven and Green Jay, the Blue Jay is intelligent and adaptable — qualities that have helped it learn to successfully co-exist with people.

Blue Jays are known to imitate a variety of other bird species, including the Bald Eagle and Eastern Screech-Owl. This noisy bird also utters a wide variety of squeaks, rattles, and croaks. Compare the Blue Jay’s many calls below.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Good to the last bite

Blue Jay

Blue Jay

It's the blue jay laughing at us...

Waiting for Peanuts

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BIRD OF THE WEEK — YELLOW-EARED PARROT — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 107,000 photos videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

YELLOW-EARED PARROT

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Ognorhynchus icterotis 
POPULATION: ~ 4,251 Individuals
IUCN STATUS: Endangered 
TREND: Increasing
HABITAT: Humid montane and elfin forest and adjacent partially cleared terrain; favors areas with wax palms.

The colorful, elusive Yellow-eared Parrot was considered by many to be a lost species until April 1999, when a group of researchers sponsored by ABC and Fundación Loro Parque discovered a group of 81 in the misty heights of the Colombian Andes.

Since this rediscovery, Yellow-eared Parrot numbers have rebounded due to intensive conservation, but like the Fuertes’s Parrot and Santa Marta Parakeet, this bird remains one of the most threatened parrot species in Colombia.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Fieldfare

Fire-fronted Serin (Serinus pusillus)

Canada Goose and Goslings

Tennessee Warbler sitting on Crabapple Blossoms

Robin

ANTIOQUIA BRUSHFINCH PROBABLY EXTINCT– BIRDS — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME is our flagship with over 12,000 members and over 800,000 photos and videos.

Contest — Waterfalls

Species Unseen For 47 Years Rediscovered Near Colombian Town Named For Miracles. Fewer than 20 Antioquia Brushfinches are known, and habitat is under immediate threat.

The Antioquia Brushfinch was first described by ornithologist Thomas Donegan in 2007, after a review of brushfinch specimens in South American and European collections. Donegan noticed three specimens labeled from San Pedro de los Milagros and “Antioquia” generally that were marked as representing the widespread Slaty Brushfinch, but looked different. Two of these specimens were undated, and one was collected in 1971. Many feared that the species “discovered” in the museum drawers was extinct, after several searches over the last 12 years failed to find it.

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John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)alpenglowtravelersDiegojack–MARCO POLO–tucker.tterence
Green Heron Impossible Balancing Act While Fishing.

Mönchsgrasmücke 5

1S0A0594

Kentucky Warbler

Crane in (f)light

Greenpeace

 

 

BIRD OF THE WEEK — RED-SHOULDERED HAWK — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 107,000 photos and videos. 

Greenpeace

UNHCR logo

BIRD OF THE WEEK

RED-SHOULDERED HAWK

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Buteo lineatus
POPULATION: 1.6 million
TREND: Stable
HABITAT: Deciduous or mixed forests, often near clearings and water; swamps.

The Red-shouldered Hawk is named for its reddish upper wing coverts, or shoulders. The lineatus in its name means “striped” in Latin, referring to its black-and-white-banded tail and finely barred reddish breast. Another distinctive field mark: translucent wing crescents, or “windows,” near the base of the wingtips, visible when the bird soars or glides overhead.

This attractive raptor is smaller and slimmer than the more widespread Red-tailed Hawk, almost resembling an accipiter such as the Cooper’s Hawk.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Eye on the Search

Appelvink / Coccothraustes coccothraustus

Cassin's Finch

Tui

Fluffy Blue Tit

Greenpeace

 

BIRD OF THE WEEK — BARN SWALLOW — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Greenpeace * United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group has over 1,500 members and over 101,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

BARN SWALLOW

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Hirundo rustica 
POPULATION: 41 million (Americas), 190 million (world)
TREND: Decreasing 
HABITAT: Breeds in open country including pastures, meadows, and farmland, often near water. Winters in a variety of open habitats.

No bird in North America is better known as a welcome companion and a useful friend to the farmer, as it courses  about the barnyard in pursuit of the troublesome insects that annoy both man and beast.

The Barn Swallow seems to benefit from life around people, as long as its prey remains abundant. The species is found around the world, as are the Short-eared OwlGolden EagleDunlin, and a handful of other bird species.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Desert hummingbird

Pheasant

2019-01-24 House Finch (1024x680)

Goldcrest

Guianan Cock-of-the-rock