BIRD OF THE WEEK — YELLOW RUMPED WARBLER — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 110,000 photos and videos.

BIRD OF THE WEEK

YELLOW RUMPED WARBLER

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Setophaga coronata
POPULATION: 150 million
TREND: Increasing
HABITAT: Breeds in coniferous and mixed forests; winters in a variety of open and second-growth habitats.

The Yellow-rumped Warbler is one of the most widespread and well-known warblers in North America. Birders affectionately refer to this species as “butter-butt,” since its bright yellow rump is an eye-catching and diagnostic field mark throughout the year. Adults also have a yellow crown patch, most obvious in adult males. This bird’s species name, coronata, means crowned.

North America is home to two migratory Yellow-rumped Warbler groups that are sometimes considered separate species: the “Myrtle” Warbler of eastern and far-northwestern North America and the “Audubon’s” Warbler of the West. The two groups hybridize where their ranges meet in southwestern Canada, and were combined into a single species in 1973, named the Yellow-rumped Warbler.

Top Contributors

DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Turdus pilaris

I believe this is the first TENNESSEE WARBLER that I've found at Circle B Bar Reserve, Lakeland, Florida

Brambling (Fringilla montifringilla)

Hummingbird on Bird of Paradise flower

Kingfisher

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BIRD OF THE WEEK — BLUE-BILLED CURASSOW — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 110,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK 

The Blue-billed Curassow is one of the birds closest to extinction in the Americas. It belongs to a group of large, ground-dwelling tropical birds that are closely related to turkeys. Some say the birds are just as tasty as domestic turkeys, and unfortunately, harvesting the birds and eggs for food is an ongoing problem.

Blue-billed Curassow populations have also declined dramatically due to habitat loss. Huge areas of lowland forest in the bird’s former range have been razed for livestock and crops, illegal coca farms, oil extraction, and mining. Although the species has been seen infrequently at other sites in Colombia, the Alliance for Zero Extinction has recognized a small portion of the Magdalena Valley as most critical for the curassow’s survival. This appears to be home to one of the last viable populations for the species.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos

Turdus iliacus - Redwing

Purple Honey Creeper - Male

Mrs Woodpecker

Tarier pâtre 2019 11

finch

BIRD OF THE WEEK — PINYON JAY — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 109,000 photos and videos.

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

SIERRA CLUB

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

BIRD OF THE WEEK

PINYON JAY

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus
POPULATION: 690,000
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Pinyon-juniper, pine, and pine-oak forests.

The gregarious Pinyon Jay, known by the folk name Blue Crow, is so closely tied to the life cycle of coniferous trees that it’s even named for its favorites, the pinyon pines.

This crestless jay of southwestern pine and juniper forests is the only representative of its genus, Gymnorhinus, which means “bare nostrils.” Unlike many of its close relatives such as the Blue Jay and Common Raven, the Pinyon Jay lacks feathers at the base of its bill to cover its nostrils.

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
Bohemian Waxwing / pestvogel

SONY-ILCE-A9, Tri Colored Heron, 00933 ,July 19, 2019

Chaffinch

Row Of Budgies, Toledo Zoo, Toledo, Ohio, United States Of America.

Red-throated Loon

NEWS AND PERSPECTIVES ON BIRD CONSERVATION — BIOlOGICAL STATION, BRAZIL — DAISIES — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME is our flagship group with over 12,000 members and over 806,000 photos and videos.

Contest — Waterfalls

BIRD CALLS

News and Perspectives on Bird Conservation

The Canudos Biological Station, located in Brazil’s Bahia Department, is a pioneering initiative managed by Biodiversitas Foundation that protects one of the planet’s most endangered and admired birds, the Lear’s Macaw (EN). Thanks to focused conservation efforts, the species’ numbers have increased from a few dozen in the late 1980s to approximately 1,700 today. The 3,274-acre reserve is striking: Its sandstone canyons are weathered into odd forms, cloaked in Caatinga habitat with giant cacti and unique flora, including the Licuri Palm, an important food for the macaw.

Canudos Biological Station is one of our top birding destinations. Photo by Ciro Ginez Albano

To see the Lear’s Macaw, go during the breeding season (March to May) and be prepared to rise before dawn. Guides at the reserve, employed from the local community, will lead you to see flocks of these large, noisy, dazzling blue birds as they flap past the dramatic red sandstone canyons where they roost and nest.

Learn more about visiting Canudos.

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John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)alpenglowtravelersDiegojack–MARCO POLO–tucker.tterence
Flowers

Sunset daisies...

Visiting Daisy :-)

Sunset daisies...

Untitled

BIRD OF THE WEEK — GRAY-BREASTED MOUNTAIN-TOUCAN — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 109,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

GRAY-BREASTED MOUNTAIN-TOUCAN

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Andigena hypoglauca 
POPULATION: Unknown
IUCN STATUS: Near Threatened
TREND: Decreasing
HABITAT: Cloud forest in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru.

The colorful Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan inhabits chilly, damp, mountainous terrain, unlike its larger lowland relatives the Channel-billed and Keel-billed Toucans. In fact, its genus name Andigena means “coming from the Andes Mountains” — a nod to this toucan’s sloping habitat.

The Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan can be differentiated from the three other mountain-toucan species by its red-, yellow-, and black-banded bill and, in one subspecies, its piercing yellow eyes.

SONY-ILCE-A9, Bluebird,05806, 1-1600, f-9, ISO 1600, 100-400@560mm

Bath time

Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus)

Red-cheeked Cordon-bleu

Peregrine falcon Falco peregrinus