SIERRA CLUB — BIOLOGICAL CONTROLS OF NON-NATIVE INVASIVE PLANTS — MACRO WORLD — PLANET EARTH OUR HOME group

PLANET EARTH OUR HOME is our flagship group with over 12,000 members and over 819,000 photos and videos.

Contest #1- Transportation

Contest #2- Your Favorite Bird

Contest #3 — Horses

Maryland Chapter chapter logo

garlic mustard

Of the 15 top non-native invasive plant species in the mid-Atlantic region four (Purple Loosestrife, Mile-a-minute, Japanese Knotweed, and Garlic Mustard) now have one or two non-native insects or fungi that feed on them being released that are host specific and effective. Since the new rules of proving host specificity went into effect about 20 years ago, the problem of bio-controls harming non-target organisms has gone down to 3% of its earlier rate. With adequate research we can find bio-controls for about 30 percent of our non-native invasive plant species and reduce our work for traditional removal of non-native species by labor-intensive cut, pull and spray.

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John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)alpenglowtravelersDiegojack–MARCO POLO–tucker.tterence

whisps in the wind

Mushroom Family

V068_MPC 3538

Wish I Could Fly (II)

Azuré des Nerpruns / 瑠璃蜆 Hermagis Paris Anastigmat Hellor 1:4.5 F 105m/m

BIRD OF THE WEEK — BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 113,000 photos and videos. 

BIRD OF THE WEEK

BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Poecile atricapillus
POPULATION: 39 million
TREND: Stable
HABITAT: Forests, thickets, parks, backyards.

The feisty Black-capped Chickadee is the most common and widespread of the seven chickadee species found in North America. Named for its call and trademark black cap, this little bird is a common sight at backyard bird feeders

Each fall, Black-capped Chickadees gather and store large supplies of seeds in many different places – an adaptation that helps them to survive harsh winters. But how do they remember where they stash their supplies of seed?

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DansPhotoArtHawkeye2011DiegojacklittlebiddleS C photos
At home in the cactus

Male Woodpecker

Agró blau al capvespre

Garrulus glandarius - Eurasian jay

Rolf_Nagel-Fl-3706-Motacilla flava-

PLANET EARTH IN SILHOUETTES group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH IN SILHOUETTES has over 1,500 members and over 238,000 photos. 

Top Contributors

orb1806BLANCA GOMEZalexinatempaJim MullhauptChrisGoldNY
[ Dusks and chips - Dusks and chips ] DSC_0416.R4.jinkoll

Night fever (Nachtfieber)

Sunset Shadows

Not a cloud in sight

Summer Vacation 2018 - Photo N3

NEW ZEALAND — TASMAN SEA –ANDREAS KAY PHOTOGRAPHY — PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD group

All PLANET EARTH groups supports:

Sierra Club* United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) * American Bird Conservancy

PLANET EARTH MACRO WORLD has over 1,500 members and over 87,000 photos and videos.

Right now, the New Zealand bottom trawling fleet is setting out for yet another season of destruction. Each year, out of sight, the NZ fishing fleet go on the hunt for orange roughy using one of the most destructive forms of fishing ever devised. They have to be stopped, and one of the first things we need to do is make people aware of what’s really going on out there.

New Zealand trawl fleet to continue destruction of deep-sea ecosystems 
in South Pacific on the high seas.

New Zealand and Australia to adopt a deeply flawed regulation that will allow continued degradation and destruction of biologically rich and diverse ecosystems in the deep-sea from the Louisville Ridge in the western central South Pacific all the way across to the Tasman Sea.

We’ve stopped environmental crimes in the past and held companies to account. Together in our thousands, we’re forcing change and seeing results.

More and more people are saying ‘no’ to trashing the oceans, forests and climate – and standing up to protect our air, land and water from pollution.

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John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG)deta kEcuador Megadiversoorb1806Hugo von Schreck Nursery web spider, Thaumasia sp., Pisauridae Small Minnow Mayfly, Baetodes sp.? Baetidae Treefrog, Agalychnis hulli Orchid bees, Eufriesea sp. (ID by Marco Gaiani), Euglossini collecting bark containing perfumes to attract females? Dewlap of the Equatorial Anole, Anolis aequatorialis

HISPANIOLA’S HIDDEN TREASURE — BLACK-CAPPED PETREL — PLANET EARTH ARCHITECTURE group

PLANET EARTH ARCHITECTURE has over 6,000 members and over 272,000 photos and videos. 

BLACK-CAPPED PETREL

The “little devil,” or Black-capped Petrel, is among the rarest and most secretive seabirds in the Western Hemisphere. Extreme habitat loss on their breeding grounds was thought to have driven the bird extinct until its rediscovery in 1963. This species remains in danger of extinction, with fewer than 2,000 pairs in existence.

These seabirds spend most of their lives in flight over open water, returning to land only to breed. One reason Black-capped Petrels remain little known is that their breeding sites are hidden in the rugged mountains of Hispaniola, the Caribbean island shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

Sign up for ABC’s eNews to learn how you can help protect birds

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Josef Lex (El buen soldado Švejk)Michael Lockeroba66Ximo MichavilaRafael Gomez – http://micamara.es
St. Nicholas Cathedral in Nicholas Convent (Pereslavl-Zalessky, Russia)

Burano

Asilah - Morocco

tableau de façade

The Bridge at Konitsa