BIRD OF THE WEEK — AGAMI HERON — PLANET EARTH BIRD WORLD group

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BIRD OF THE WEEK

Agami Heron

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Agamia agami
POPULATION: Unknown
TREND: Unknown
HABITAT: Tropical lowland forests along streams, small rivers, and swamps; coastal mangrove swamp.

The colorful, reclusive Agami Heron is a coveted sighting for birders visiting flooded lowland forests and slow-moving waterways of Central and South America. This long-billed, medium-sized heron is so distinctive that it occupies its own genus, Agamia. Its species name, “Agami,” comes from a Cayenne Indian word for a forest bird.

Agami Heron, Kyle C. Moon

In Brazil, the Agami is sometimes called Soco beija-flor, “hummingbird heron,” for its vivid plumage. It’s also commonly known as the Chestnut-bellied Heron.

Threats to Agami Heron are poorly understood, but habitat loss is probably one of the most significant factors affecting this heron and other birds that share its lowland habitat, including Mangrove Hummingbird, Great Curassow, and Harpy Eagle.

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